Social justice in a global world

A.A. 2015/2016
6
Crediti massimi
40
Ore totali
Lingua
Inglese
Obiettivi formativi
This course is articulated in two parts.

Part 1: This part of the course addresses normative challenges of distributive justice with a particular focus on the global dimension. Throughout the discussion of the problem of inequalities at the global level, it solicits foundational questions in moral and political philosophy with respect to the grounds and scope of justice. In this sense, this part has two main aims: on one hand, it will focus on basic questions concerning the problem of distributive justice with a general overview of the main positions within the contemporary philosophical debate. On the other hand, it will tackle issues concerning how to morally assess political and economic institutions beyond the nation state. Questions pursued in this course include: what is relevant to distributive justice (income, wealth, opportunities, welfare, etc.)? On what basis should the distribution be made? Are there any obligations of distributive justice? Are inequalities at the domestic level different from inequalities at the international one?

Part 2: This part of the course addresses inequality and distributional issues from an economic point of view. Topics covered include: how to measure inequality, in its different dimensions, within and across countries; the evolution of inequality in Western countries over the last decades and its causes; the trade/technology/institutions debate; the role of immigration in determining economic inequality.
Programma e organizzazione didattica

Edizione unica

Responsabile
Periodo
Primo trimestre
STUDENTI FREQUENTANTI
Prerequisiti e modalità di esame
Attendant students
Part 1: Students will be assessed on the basis of their performances in discussions and presentations. At the end of the course, students will be required to deliver an in-class written test. While the written test is meant to offer students the opportunity to show their knowledge about the issues addressed during the course, presentations aim to assess their capacity to present and critically discuss a topic, to propose original readings and insights about it, and to consistently defend their claims. Final grades will be awarded by weighting participation, presentation and test as follows:

Participation 25 %
Presentation 35 %
Test 40 %

Part 2: Students will be assessed on the basis of their performances in discussions and presentations. At the end of the course, students will be required to deliver an in-class written test. While the written test is meant to offer students the opportunity to show their knowledge about the issues addressed during the course, presentations aim to assess their capacity to present and critically discuss a topic, to propose original readings and insights about it, and to consistently defend their claims. Final grades will be awarded by weighting participation, presentation and test as follows:

Participation 25 %
Presentation 35 %
Test 40 %
Metodi didattici
The course combines lessons, students' presentations, and class discussion.
Materiale didattico e bibliografia
Syllabus - part 1

Week 1: Preliminaries
· Lu, C. (1998) "Images of Justice: Justice as a Bond, a Boundary and a Balance", The Journal of Political Philosophy, 6(1), pp. 1-26.
· Maffettone, S. (2012) "Justice", in A. Besussi [ed.] A Companion to Political Philosophy. Methods, Tools, Topics, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 183-194.
· Carter, I. (2012) "Equality", in A. Besussi [ed.] A Companion to Political Philosophy. Methods, Tools, Topics, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 161-170

Week 2: The Rawlsian Paradigm
· Rawls, J. (1971) A theory of justice, Cambridge: Harvard University Press (parts).

Week 3: The Rawlsian Paradigm
· Rawls, J. (1971) A theory of justice, Cambridge: Harvard University Press (parts).

Week 4: Students' presentations

Week 5: Egalitarianism
· Sen, A. (1980) "Equality of what?", Tanner Lectures on Human Values.
· Walzer, M. (1983) Spheres of Justice, New York, Basic Books, chap. 1.

Week 6: Students' presentations

Week 7: Theories of global justice
· Beitz, C. R. (2005) "Cosmopolitanism and Global Justice", The Journal of Ethics, 9(1/2), pp. 11-27.
· Rawls, J. (1999) The law of the peoples, Cambridge: Harvard University Press (parts).
· Pogge, T. W. (1994) "An egalitarian law of peoples", Philosophy & Public Affairs, 23(3), pp. 195-224.

Week 8: Students' presentations

Week 9: Global justice and its critics
· Miller, D. (2005) "Against Global Egalitarianism", The Journal of Ethics, 9(1/2), pp. 55-79.
· Nagel, T. (2005) "The Problem of Global Justice", Philosophy and Public Affairs, 33, pp. 113-147.

Week 10: Students' presentations

Syllabus - part 2

Lecture 1: Inequality: trends, concepts and measuremet
· Cowell, F. A. (2011) Measuring Inequality (third edition), Oxford University Press, Oxford. (parts)
· Milanovic, B. (2005) Worlds Apart - Measuring International and Global Inequality, Princeton University Press, (parts)
· Salverda, W., Nolan, B. and Smeeding, T.M. (2009) The Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality, Oxford University Press, (parts)

Lecture 2: Inequality: trends, concepts and measuremet
· Cowell, F. A. (2011) Measuring Inequality (third edition), Oxford University Press, Oxford. (parts)
· Milanovic, B. (2005) Worlds Apart - Measuring International and Global Inequality, Princeton University Press, (parts)
· Salverda, W., Nolan, B. and Smeeding, T.M. (2009) The Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality, Oxford University Press, (parts)

Lecture 3: The determinants of recent changes in within country inequality
· Lemieux, T. (2008) "The changing nature of wage inequality", Journal of Population Economics, 21:21-48.

Lecture 4: The determinants of recent changes in within country inequality: skill biased technical change
· Card, D. and DiNardo, J.(2002) "Skill-Biased Technological Change and Rising Wage Inequality: Some Problems and Puzzles" Journal of Labor Economics, 20(4), 733-783.

Lecture 5: Students' presentations

Lecture 6: The determinants of recent changes in within country inequality: trade
· Wood, A. (1995). "How Trade Hurt Unskilled Workers." Journal of Economic Perspectives, 9(3): 57-80.

Lecture 7: Students' presentations

Lecture 8: The determinants of recent changes in within country inequality: institutions
· Fortin, N.M., and Lemieux, T. (1997). "Institutional Changes and Rising Wage Inequality: Is There a Linkage?" Journal of Economic Perspectives, 11(2): 75-96.

Lecture 9: Students' presentations

Lecture 10: Immigration and Inequality
· Card, David. 2009. "Immigration and Inequality." American Economic Review, 99(2): 1-21
STUDENTI NON FREQUENTANTI
Prerequisiti e modalità di esame
Non attendant students
Part 1: For non-attendant students the exam is divided into two parts: a written test and an oral examination (provided the written test is passed). The written test and the oral examination contribute to the final mark each for 50%.
Part 2: Written examination.
Materiale didattico e bibliografia
Part 1:
Material for the written test
· Maffettone, S. (2012) "Justice", in A. Besussi [ed.] A Companion to Political Philosophy. Methods, Tools, Topics, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 183-194.
· Carter, I. (2012) "Equality", in A. Besussi [ed.] A Companion to Political Philosophy. Methods, Tools, Topics, Farnham: Ashgate, pp. 161-170.
· Brock, G. (2009) Global Justice: A Cosmopolitan Account, Oxford: Oxford University Press, Chapters 1, 2, 3, 5, 9.

Material for the oral examination:
Each student should prepare two readings from the following list:
· Beitz, C. R. (2005) "Cosmopolitanism and Global Justice", The Journal of Ethics, 9(1/2), pp. 11-27.
· Pogge, T. (2005) "Real World Justice", The Journal of Ethics, 9(1/2), pp. 29-53.
· Miller, D. (2005) "Against Global Egalitarianism", The Journal of Ethics, 9(1/2), pp. 55-79.
· Arneson, R. J. (2005) "Do patriotic ties limit Global Justice duties?", Current Debates in Global Justice, (2), pp. 127-150.
· Risse, M. (2005) "What do we owe to the global poor", The Journal of Ethics, 9(1/2), pp. 81-117.
· Nagel, T. (2005) "The Problem of Global Justice", Philosophy and Public Affairs, 33, pp. 113-147.
· Ypi, L. (2013) "Cosmopolitanism Without If and Without But", in G. Brock [ed.] Cosmopolitanism versus Non-Cosmopolitanism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 75-91.
· Sangiovanni, A. (2013) "On the Relation between Moral and Distributive Equality", in G. Brock [ed.] Cosmopolitanism versus Non-Cosmopolitanism, Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 55-74.

Part 2:
Material for the written examination
· Cowell, F. A. (2011) Measuring Inequality (third edition), Oxford University Press, Oxford, chapters 1-2
· Milanovic, B. (2005) Worlds Apart - Measuring International and Global Inequality, Princeton University Press, chapters 1-3.
· Salverda, W., Nolan, B. and Smeeding, T.M. (2009) The Oxford Handbook of Economic Inequality, Oxford University Press, (parts), chapter 3
· Lemieux, T. (2008) "The changing nature of wage inequality", Journal of Population Economics, 21:21-48.
· Card, D. and DiNardo, J.(2002) "Skill-Biased Technological Change and Rising Wage Inequality: Some Problems and Puzzles" Journal of Labor Economics, 20(4), 733-783.
· Berman, E., Bound, J. and Machin, S. (1998) "Implications Of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence" The Quarterly Journal of Economics, vol. 113(4), 1245-1279.
· Wood, A. (1995). "How Trade Hurt Unskilled Workers." Journal of Economic Perspectives, 9(3): 57-80.
· Feenstra, R. C. (1998). "Integration of Trade and Disintegration of Production in the Global Economy." Journal of Economic Perspectives, 12(4): 31-50.
· Fortin, N.M., and Lemieux, T. (1997). "Institutional Changes and Rising Wage Inequality: Is There a Linkage?" Journal of Economic Perspectives, 11(2): 75-96.
· Dustmann, C., Ludsteck, J. and Schönberg, U. (2009), "Revisiting the German Wage Structure", The Quarterly Journal of Economics, 124 (2): 843-881.
· Card, D. (2009). "Immigration and Inequality." American Economic Review, 99(2): 1-21
Docente/i
Ricevimento:
Nel I trimestre 2019-2020 il ricevimento sarà martedi 15-17. NB il ricevimento di martedi 1o dicembre è spostato a mercoledi 11 stessa ora
Ufficio 209 - II Piano - Via Passione 13
Ricevimento:
Mercoledì 10:00-12:30.
stanza 11-2° piano