Governing the future: goals and tools

A.A. 2021/2022
9
Crediti massimi
60
Ore totali
SSD
SPS/04
Lingua
Inglese
Obiettivi formativi
The course has an interdisciplinary character and it pursues three main learning objectives.
First, the course aims at introducing students to major topics and themes animating ongoing public debates. The selected themes and topics will be addressed with a view to provide a practical sense of the challenges and opportunities connected to current political or social-economic phenomena and trends, on the one hand, and to offer students the opportunity to better grasp the requirements for devising long-term strategic plans, on the other.
Second, the course intends to familiarize students with methodological tools to critically interpret political or socio-economic phenomena, to analyze empirical data and to develop rigorous research designs in the field of social sciences and philosophy.
Third, the course aims at offering students high-level training in logics and argumentative strategies, which will strengthen students' analytical capacities and their ability to assess and defend normative and policy proposals.
Risultati apprendimento attesi
Knowledge and understanding
Students are expected to acquire in-depth knowledge concerning some major issues at the centre of current political debates and a clear understanding about the relevant considerations for developing effective long-term plans to address challenging and controversial public questions. Students are also expected to acquire advanced methodological competences to examine and assess empirical phenomena as well as consolidated familiarity with argumentative strategies.

Applying knowledge and understanding
Students are expected to be able to apply their acquired methodological and argumentative competences to interpret and evaluate political events or phenomena and to devise and defend policy or normative proposals that are sensitive to criteria of feasibility and effectiveness, on the one hand, and to value considerations, on the other.

Making judgment
At the end of the course, students are expected be able to formulate autonomous and rigorous judgments, based on accurate empirical analyses. Students are also expected to be able to autonomously and critically assess arguments proposed within public debates, to verify their logical consistency and their empirical reliability.

Communication
Students are expected to strengthen and refine their communicative skills, thanks to specific training in argumentative strategies and logics and to in-class discussions, which are specifically meant to provide students with opportunities for practicing and improve their communicative abilities.
Programma e organizzazione didattica

Edizione unica

Periodo
Primo trimestre
All the lessons of Modules 1 and 2 will be held on campus and they will also be live-streamed on Microsoft Teams. All the lessons of Module 3 will be online only, live-streamed on Microsoft Teams.
All lessons will also be recorded and made available afterwards on MTeams.

The program and the materials required will not change due to the sanitary emergency.
Programma
This course provides students with conceptual and methodological tools to understand and address the challenges connected to current political debates, and applies them to a specific - and crucial - topic, i.e. solidarity. The course is composed of three modules.
The first module (Prof. Ronchi) provides an introduction to the methodological approaches used in empirical research in social and political science. It shows how to draw consistent research designs and walks the students through the basics of the most widely used quantitative and qualitative methods. The second module (Prof. Cepollaro) aims at introducing students to major topics and themes of critical thinking. It teaches students how to spot and analyse, how to refute and reject an argument. The third module (Prof. Tava, ONLINE only) focuses on the meaning and function of solidarity, and on the relevance of this notion within today's key social and political scenarios (migration, future of work, racism, pandemic). Students will have the chance to apply the skills acquired in the first module by engaging with the current literature on this topic and will animate a series of presentations and discussions around the definition and scope of solidarity practices, and the contextual constraints that their implementation involves.
Prerequisiti
The course has no formal prerequisites.
Metodi didattici
The course is composed of taught classes that actively involve students, as well as lessons in which students are required to pre-read an article and/or to present and discuss one in class.
Materiale di riferimento
*REFERENCES - Module 1 (Ronchi)*
Note: see in the file on Ariel which texts are compulsory or optional.
Beach, D., and Pedersen, R. B. (2019). Process-tracing methods: Foundations and guidelines. University of Michigan Press. (Chapters 1 and 2)
Oana, I. E., Pellegata, A., and Wang, C. (2021). A cure worse than the disease? Exploring the health-economy trade-off during COVID-19. West European Politics, 1-26.
Berton, F., Richiardi, M., and Sacchi, S. (2012). The political economy of work security and flexibility: Italy in comparative perspective. Policy Press. (Chapters 2 and 7)
Bulfone, F., and Tassinari, A. (2020). Under pressure. Economic constraints, electoral politics and labour market reforms in Southern Europe in the decade of the Great Recession. European Journal of Political Research.
Della Porta, D., and Keating, M. (Eds.). (2008). Approaches and methodologies in the social sciences: A pluralist perspective. Cambridge University Press. (chapters 1, 11 + selected chapters listed here under the authors' names)
De Vaus, D., 2001. Research design in social research. London: SAGE (chapter 1)
Ferrera, M., Miró, J., & Ronchi, S. (2021). Walking the road together? EU polity maintenance during the COVID-19 crisis. West European Politics, 1-24
Ferrera, M., Jessoula, M., and Fargion, V. (2013). At the roots of the Italian unbalanced welfare state: the grip of cognitive frames and "red-white" political competition. Working paper - Banca d'Italia-area ricerca economica e relazioni internazionali.
9
Franklin, Mark (2008). Quantitative analysis, In: Della Porta, D., and Keating, M. (Eds.) Approaches and methodologies in the social sciences: A pluralist perspective. Cambridge University Press, 240-262.
George, Alexander L. And Andrew Bennett (2005): Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences. Cambridge: MIT Press. 73-124 (Chapter 4).
Gerhards, J., Lengfeld, H., & Häuberer, J. (2016). Do European citizens support the idea of a European welfare state? Evidence from a comparative survey conducted in three EU member states. International Sociology, 31(6), 677-700.
Gingrich, j. And Ansell, B. W. (2015). The dynamics of social investment: human capital, activation and care, In: Beramendi, P., Häusermann, S., Kitschelt, H., and Kriesi, H. (Eds.). (2015). The politics of advanced capitalism. Cambridge University Press, 282-304.
Héritier, Adrienne (2008). Causal explanation, In: Della Porta, D., and Keating, M. (Eds.) Approaches and methodologies in the social sciences: A pluralist perspective. Cambridge University Press, 61-79.
King, Gary/Robert O. Keohane/Sidney Verba (1994): Designing Social In-quiry. Princeton: Princeton University Press. 3-34 (Chapter 1).
Levy, Jack S. (2008): Case Studies: Types, Designs, and Logics of Inference. Conflict Management and Peace Science 25. 1-18.
Mahoney, James and Gary Goertz (2006): A Tale of Two Cultures: Contrasting Quantitative and Qualitative Research. In: Political Analysis 14(3). 227-49.
Mair, Peter (2008). 'Concepts and concept formation', In Della Porta, D., and Keating, M. (Eds.) Approaches and methodologies in the social sciences: A pluralist perspective. Cambridge University Press, 177-197.
Natili, M., Negri, F., & Ronchi, S. (2021). Widening double dualisation? Labour market inequalities and national social policy responses in Western Europe during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, paper presented at ESPAnet Annual Conference, KU Leuven, 31 August - 3 September 2021.
Papadimitriou, D., Pegasiou, A., and Zartaloudis, S. (2019). European elites and the narrative of the Greek crisis: A discursive institutionalist analysis. European Journal of Political Research, 58(2), 435-464.
Ragin, Charles (1997): Turning the Tables: How Case-oriented Research Challenges Variable-oriented Research. Comparative Social Research, 16. 27-42.
Schimmelfennig, Frank (2001). The Community Trap: Liberal Norms, Rhetor-ical Action, and the Eastern Enlargement of the European Union. International Organization 55(1). 47-80.
Schizzerotto, A., Vergolini, L. & Zanini, N. (2014) "The Minimum Guaranteed Income in the Province of Trento: Evidence from an Impact Evaluation", IRVAPP working paper, November 2014. Heritier 2008_chapter-causal explanation
Schmidt, V. A. (2008). Discursive institutionalism: The explanatory power of ideas and discourse. Annual review of political science, 11.
Schmitter, P. C. (2016). The design of social and political research. Chinese political science review, 1(4), 577-609.
Seawright, J., and Gerring, J. (2008). Case selection techniques in case study research: A menu of qualitative and quantitative options. Political research quarterly, 61(2), 294-308.
Sommer Harrits, G. (2011). More than method?: A discussion of paradigm differences within mixed methods research. Journal of mixed methods research, 5(2), 150-166.
Steinmo, Sven (2008). 'Historical institutionalism', In Della Porta, D., and Keating, M. (Eds.) Approaches and methodologies in the social sciences: A pluralist perspective. Cambridge University Press, 118-138.
Trampusch, Christine (2010). Employers, the State, and the Politics of Institutional Change. Vocational Education and Training in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. European Journal of Political Research 49(4). 545-73.
Van Kersbergen, K., and Vis, B. (2015). Three worlds' typology: Moving beyond normal science?. Journal of European Social Policy, 25(1), 111-123.
Zhang, N., Andrighetto, G., Ottone, S., Ponzano, F., and Steinmo, S. (2016). " Willing to Pay?" Tax Compliance in Britain and Italy: An Experimental Analysis. PLoS One, 11(2).

*REFERENCES - Module 2 (Cepollaro)*
The class material is based on these texts:
Bowell, Tracy, and Gary Kemp. Critical thinking: A concise guide. Routledge, 2014. [Chapter 1-7]
Fosl, Peter S., and Julian Baggini. The philosopher's toolkit: a compendium of philosophical concepts and methods. John Wiley & Sons, 2020. [Chapters 1-3]
McKay, Thomas (2000), Reasons, Explanations and Decisions: Guidelines for Critical Thinking. Wadsworth. [Chapters 1-5, 8] (Hard to find: the material provided in the slides will be enough)
Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter. Think again: how to reason and argue. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2018. [Chapters 5-10]

*REFERENCES - Module 3 (Tava)*
Appiah, K Anthony. 1996. Race, Culture, identity: Misunderstood Connections. In Color Conscious: The Political Morality of Race, edited by K. Anthony Appiah and Amy Gutmann, 30-105. Princeton: Princeton university Press.
Bast, Jürgen. 2018. Deepening Supranational Integration: Interstate Solidarity in EU Migration Law. In Solidarity in EU Law: Legal Principle in the Making, edited by A. Biondi, et al, 114-132. Northampton, MA: Edward Elgar Publishing.
Bayertz, Kurt. 1999. Four Uses of "Solidarity". In Solidarity, edited by Kurt Bayertz. Dondrecht: Kluwer.
Blum, Lawrence. 2007. Three Kinds of Race‐Related Solidarity. Journal of Social Philosophy 38: 53-72
Burgoon, Brian. 2014. Immigration, Integration, and Support for Redistribution in Europe. World Politics 66, 3: 365-405.
Capaldi, Nicholas. 1999. What's Wrong with Solidarity? In Solidarity, edited by K. Bayertz, 39-55. Dondrecht: Springer.
Chouliaraki, Lilie. 2013. The Ironic Spectator: Solidarity in the Age of Post- Humanitarianism. Cambridge: Polity Press, 2013.
Cole, Phil. 2021. Exploring the Borderlands of Solidarity: Europe and the Refugee Question. In The Routledge Handbook of Philosophy and Europe, edited by D. Meacham and N. de Warren. London: Routledge.
Della Porta, Donatella. 2019. Solidarity Mobilizations in the 'Refugee Crisis'. Basingstoke: Pelgrave Macmillan.
Doellgast, Virginia. 2018. From Dualization to Solidarity: Halting the Cycle of Precarity. In Reconstructing Solidarity: Labour Unions, Precarious Work, and the Politics of Institutional Change in Europe, edited by Virginia Doellgast, et al. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Duarte, Melina. 2020. The Ethical Consequences of Criminalizing Solidarity in the EU. Theoria 86: 28-53.
European Commission. 2019. Progress report on the Implementation of the European Agenda on Migration.
European Economic and Social Committee. 2020. Solidarity Should be the Keyword for Tackling Migration in the Aftermath of the Pandemic.
European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies. 2018. Future of Work, Future of Society.
European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies. 2020. Statement on European Solidarity and the Protection of Fundamental Rights in the COVID-19 Pandemic.
European Parliament. 2018. Fit for purpose? The Facilitation Directive and the Criminalisation of Humanitarian Assistance to Irregular Migrants:
2018 Update.
Fekete, Liz. 2018. Migrants, borders and the criminalisation of solidarity in the EU. Race & Class 59, 4: 65-83.
Fenton, N. 2008. Mediating solidarity. Global Media and Communication 4, 1: 37-57.
Ferrera, Maurizio, and Carlo Burelli. 2019. Cross-National Solidarity and Political Sustainability in the EU after the Crisis. Journal of Common Market Studies 57, 1: 94-110.
Gould, Carol. 2007. Transnational Solidarities. Journal of Social Philosophy, Vol. 38 No. 1: 148-164.
Guinier, Lani, and Gerald Torres. 2002. The Miner's Canary: Enlisting Race, Resisting Power, Transforming Democracy. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
Habermas, rgen. 2013. Democracy, Solidarity, and the European Crisis. Lecture delivered on 26 April 2013 at KU Leuven, Belgium.
Hayward, ac , and R diger urzel. 2012. Conclusion: European Disunion: Between Sovereignty and Solidarity. In European Disunion Between Sovereignty and Solidarity, edited by J. Hayward and R. Wurzel, 314-28. Basingstoke: Pelgrave Macmillan.
Horn, Ruth, Angeliki Kerasidou. 2020 Sharing whilst Caring: Solidarity and Public Trust in a Data-Driven Healthcare System. BMC Med Ethics 21, 110.
Hummel, Patrick, and Matthias Braun. Just data? Solidarity and justice in data-driven medicine. Life Science, Society, and Policy 16, 8 (2020)
International Labour Organization. 2019. Work for a Brighter Future - Global Commission on the Future of Work.
Jaeggi, Rahel. 2017. Pathologies of Work. Women's Studies Quarterly 45, 3-4: 59-76.
Jecker, Nancy, and Caesar Atuire. 2021. Out of Africa: A Solidarity-Based Approach to Vaccine Allocation. Hastings Center Report 51, 3: 27-36
Kolers, Avery. 2012. Dynamics of Solidarity. The Journal of Political Philosophy 20, 4: 365-383.
IRR. 2017. Humanitarianism: The Unacceptable Face of Solidarity.
Lucivero, Federica, Luca Marelli, Nora Hangel, Bettina Maria Zimmermann, Barbara Prainsack, Ilaria Galasso, Ruth Horn, Katharina Kieslich, Marjolein Lanzing, Elisa Lievevrouw, Fernandos Ongolly, Gabrielle Samuel, Tamar Sharon, Lotje Siffels, Emma Stendahl, and Ine Van Hoyweghen. 2021. Normative positions towards COVID-19 contact-tracing apps: findings from a large-scale qualitative study in nine European countries. Critical Public Health.
Mainwaring, Cetta, and Daniela DeBono. 2021. Criminalizing Solidarity: Search and Rescue in a Neo-Colonial Sea. Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space 39, 5: 1030-1048.
Marino, Sara. 2021. Mediating the Refugee Crisis: Digital Solidarity, Humanitarian Technologies and Border Regimes. Cham: Pelgrave.
Meacham, Darian, and Francesco Tava. 2021. The Algorithmic Disruption of Workplace Solidarity: Phenomenology and the Future of Work Question. Philosophy Today, 65(3), 571-598.
Nikunen, Kaarina. 2019. Media Solidarities: Emotions, Power and Justice in the Digital Age. London: Sage.
Prainsack, Barbara, and Alena Buyx. 2017. Solidarity in Biomedicine and Beyond. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
Prainsack, Barbara, and Alena Buyx. 2018. The Value of Work: Addressing the Future of Work through the Lens of Solidarity. Bioethics 32: 585-592.
Prainsack, Barbara. Solidarity in Times of Pandemics. Democratic Theory 7, 2: 124-133.
Rippe, Klaus Peter. 1998. Diminishing Solidarity. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 1: 355-374
Roediger, David. 2016. Making Solidarity Uneasy: Cautions on a Keyword from Black Lives Matter to the Past. American Quarterly 68(2): 223-248.
Sangiovanni, Andrea. 2013. Solidarity in the European Union. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 33, 2: 1-29.
Sharon, Tamar. 2017. Self-Tracking for Health and the Quantified Self: Re-Articulating Autonomy, Solidarity and Authenticity in an Age of Personalized Healthcare. Philosophy & Technology 30, 1: 93-121.
Shelby, Tommie. 2002. Foundations of Black Solidarity: Collective Identity or Common Oppression? Ethics 112(2): 231-266.
Shelby, Tommie. 2005. We Who Are Dark: The Philosophical Foundations of Black Solidarity. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press.
Scholz, Sally. 2015. Seeking Solidarity. Philosophy Compass 10, 10: 725-735.
Scholz, Sally. 2008. Political Solidarity. University Park, PA: Penn State University Press.
Thomas, Mark P., and Steven Tufts. 2020. Blue Solidarity: Police Unions, Race and Authoritarian Populism in North America. Work, Employment and Society 34, 1: 126-144.
Modalità di verifica dell’apprendimento e criteri di valutazione
*Attending students (studenti frequentanti)*:
Module 1 (33%)
(Prof. Ronchi): Attending students can either give a class presentation or submit a 1000-word review paper to Prof. Ronchi, at least 1 week before the official date of the exam in order to allow time for grading.
Module 2 (33%)
(Prof. Cepollaro): Attending students are expected to submit three sets of argumentation exercises.
Module 3 (33%)
(Prof. Tava): Attending students can either give a class presentation or submit a 1000-word review paper to Prof. Tava, at least 1 week before the official date of the exam in order to allow time for grading.
Each module counts 33% towards the calculus of the final grade. The final grade is the rounded average of the three modules' grades.
*Non-attending students (studenti non frequentanti)*:
Non-attending students need to follow all three following steps:
Module 1 (33%): Non-attending students must submit 1500-word (max) review paper based on selected readings from Module 1 to Prof. Ronchi, at least a week before the official exam date in order to allow time for grading. Please get in contact with the professor to ask for information or about possible topics and/or further readings.
Module 2 (33%): Get in contact with Prof. Cepollaro to have the set of exercises on which the evaluation on Mod.1 is based; you should get in contact with the professor beforehand (at least 15 days before the exam day) so that she can send you the exam and you can have about 2 weeks to complete and submit the exercises.
Module 3 (33%): Non-attending students must submit 1500-word (max) review paper based on selected readings from Module 1 to Prof. Tava, at least a week before the official exam date in order to allow time for grading. Please get in contact with the professor to ask for information or about possible topics and/or further readings.
Note for Modules 1 and 3: professors will notified students with the final grade as soon as the correction and grading process is complete (reasonably, within 1 week from the deadline for submitting the papers).
Each module counts 33% towards the calculus of the final grade. The final grade is the rounded average of the three modules' grades.
SPS/04 - SCIENZA POLITICA - CFU: 9
Lezioni: 60 ore
Docenti: Cepollaro Biancamaria, Ronchi Stefano, Tava Francesco
Docente/i
Ricevimento:
da accordare via email
online via Teams