English for international relations

A.Y. 2021/2022
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
L-LIN/12
Language
English
Learning objectives
The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the language of political discourse in English. The course involves the close analysis of both of authentic political speeches and documents and press coverage of international affairs. The material will be also analysed in the light of theories on persuasion, communicative functions and the concepts of face and politeness.
Expected learning outcomes
The course is expected to develop: the overall ability to understand the fundamental ideas of complex texts about factual or abstract matters, including technical texts from the area of specialization (English for International Relations); the ability to understand oral discourse of a certain length and to follow a speakers arguments on a relatively familiar topic (English for International Relations); the ability to understand current affairs texts in which the author takes a positions or argues for a certain point of view (in the sphere of English for International Relations); the familiarity with some concepts and theories that underlie linguistic analysis of political discourse.
Course syllabus and organization

A-K

Responsible
Lesson period
Third trimester
In case of a health emergency, the course will be taught online live, through MS Teams, and the recorded sessions will be uploaded on Ariel.
Exams will assess the same abilities, but may be administered either online, through MS Teams and Moodle + SEB / proctoring, or as oral interviews.
Course syllabus
Part 1 - Grammar Review
Grammatical revision of the main syntactic aspects to cover in order to move from the B1 to the B2 level, with a focus on verb tenses and their use and function.

Part 2 - International Political Communication in English
International political communication in English: themes, genres, registers, methods of speech and characteristic lexical uses. Analysis of some political speeches representative of different textual genres and highlights of recent history.

Part 3 - International Politics and the Media
Politics and the media. Textual genres and linguistic structures of journalistic discourse, processes of representation of international politics, lexicon referring to current affairs with reference to international relations. Case studies on international political and commercial issues. Analysis of official and popular texts produced by international organizations or mediated through the press.

Part 4 - Skills Practice
Practical applications of the notions acquired in the previous parts of the course, focussing in particular on active production, i.e. speaking (public speaking) and writing (cohesion in writing) skills.
Prerequisites for admission
Entry level required: B1 of the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference of the Council of Europe), that is: ability to understand the key points of familiar topics concerning work, school, leisure time, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
Students needing to fill gaps can make use of this or other B1 grammars:
Murphy, Raymond. Essential Grammar in Use. CUP. With keys.
Teaching methods
The course is lecture-based, but students are expected to actively participate in the lessons. The development of skills and competences is crucial; because of this, students will be required to work assiduosuly on the development and consolidation of academic and political English skills through constant critical practice. The teaching methods used will draw from applied functional linguistics, especially from the English-speaking tradition. Classes will be taught in English.
Teaching Resources
Adopted textbooks:
- Rogers, Louis & Dorothy Zemach. Skillful Second Edition Level 3 Reading and Writing Premium Student's Book Pack. London: Macmillan Education.
- Alan Partington 2018. The Language of Persuasion in Politics. London: Routledge.
- Caroline M. de B. Clark. 2006. Views in the news. A textbook. Milan: LED.

All the material that will be provided on Ariel:
- Authentic texts to study and analyse and grammar exercises aimed at preparing for the exam.
- Additional suggested theoretical readings.
- Slides relating to the course's parts.

Recommended grammar:
- Raymond Murphy 2014. English Grammar in Use. Intermediate. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. With keys.
Assessment methods and Criteria
Evaluation is exam based. The exam is in written form and aims to ascertain students' competences - both theoretical and in applied forms - in respect of the topics and language varieties discussed during the course and in the textbooks and materials in the reading list. In particular, students will have to prove their competence in using the structures of academic English (B2 level), and to be familiar with the key genres and linguistic structures of Political English.
The exam comprises the following parts:
- A closed-question test on the notions and competences acquired about International Politics and the Media (part 2) (30 minutes); no dictionary allowed. The test is composed of 35 items and the final mark is expressed out of 30 points. It will also test the students' linguistic skills.
- A closed-question test on the notions and competences acquired about the relationship between International Politics and the Media (part 3) (30 minutes), focussing on verb tenses and textual cohesion; no dictionary allowed. The test is composed of 35 items and the final mark is expressed out of 30 points. It will also test the students' linguistic skills.
- A closed-question test on the linguistic notions and grammatical skills acquired during the (parts 1 and 4) (30 minutes); no dictionary allowed. The test is composed of 30 items and the final mark is expressed out of 30 points.
The final mark is the average of the marks obtained in the various parts and is expressed out of 30 points. Continuous assessment may be implemented, in the form of interim tests.
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Professor: Grego Kim Serena

L-Z

Responsible
Lesson period
Third trimester
Course syllabus
Part 1 - Grammar Review
Grammatical revision of the main syntactic aspects to cover in order to move from the B1 to the B2 level, with a focus on verb tenses and their use and function.

Part 2 - International Political Communication in English
International political communication in English: themes, genres, registers, methods of speech and characteristic lexical uses. Analysis of some political speeches representative of different textual genres and highlights of recent history.

Part 3 - International Politics and the Media
Politics and the media. Textual genres and linguistic structures of journalistic discourse, processes of representation of international politics, lexicon referring to current affairs with reference to international relations. Case studies on international political and commercial issues. Analysis of official and popular texts produced by international organizations or mediated through the press.

Part 4 - Skills Practice
Practical applications of the notions acquired in the previous parts of the course, focussing in particular on active production, i.e. speaking (public speaking) and writing (cohesion in writing) skills.
Prerequisites for admission
Entry level required: B1 of the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference of the Council of Europe), that is: ability to understand the key points of familiar topics concerning work, school, leisure time, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
Teaching methods
The course is lecture-based, but students are expected to actively participate in the lessons. The development of skills and competences is crucial; because of this, students will be required to work assiduosuly on the development and consolidation of academic and political English skills through constant critical practice. The teaching methods used will draw from applied functional linguistics, especially from the English-speaking tradition. Classes will be taught in English.
Teaching Resources
Adopted textbooks:
- Rogers, Louis & Dorothy Zemach. Skillful Second Edition Level 3 Reading and Writing Premium Student's Book Pack. London: Macmillan Education.
- Alan Partington 2018. The Language of Persuasion in Politics. London: Routledge.
- Caroline M. de B. Clark. 2006. Views in the news. A textbook. Milan: LED.

All the material that will be provided on Ariel:
- Authentic texts to study and analyse and grammar exercises aimed at preparing for the exam.
- Additional suggested theoretical readings.
- Slides relating to the course's parts.

Recommended grammar:
- Raymond Murphy 2014. English Grammar in Use. Intermediate. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. With keys.
Assessment methods and Criteria
Evaluation is exam based. The exam is in written form and aims to ascertain students' competences - both theoretical and in applied forms - in respect of the topics and language varieties discussed during the course and in the textbooks and materials in the reading list. In particular, students will have to prove their competence in using the structures of academic English (B2 level), and to be familiar with the key genres and linguistic structures of Political English.
The exam comprises the following parts:
- A closed-question test on the notions and competences acquired about International Politics and the Media (part 2) (30 minutes); no dictionary allowed. The test is composed of 35 items and the final mark is expressed out of 30 points. It will also test the students' linguistic skills.
- A closed-question test on the notions and competences acquired about the relationship between International Politics and the Media (part 3) (30 minutes), focussing on verb tenses and textual cohesion; no dictionary allowed. The test is composed of 35 items and the final mark is expressed out of 30 points. It will also test the students' linguistic skills.
- A closed-question test on the linguistic notions and grammatical skills acquired during the (parts 1 and 4) (30 minutes); no dictionary allowed. The test is composed of 30 items and the final mark is expressed out of 30 points.
The final mark is the average of the marks obtained in the various parts and is expressed out of 30 points. Continuous assessment may be impl
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Professor: Tiengo Adele
Professor(s)
Reception:
Pls book an appointment via email
Via call on Teams / Room 23, via Conservatorio 7