Economics and history of globalization

A.Y. 2019/2020
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
SECS-P/12
Language
Italian
Learning objectives
The course addresses the complex reality of globalization considering its causes, dynamics and effects from a historical and economic perspective, from the nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century. In particular, a number of issues are discussed, such as the causal role played by the 'invisible hand' of the market, the political economies of states and the interests of multinationals, and the positive and negative effects on levels of wealth and economic and social inequality.

The objectives of the course are:
- to stimulate reflection and self-judgment on the current process of globalization, through the acquisition of knowledge of the main concepts, themes and dynamics of international economic history, politics and economic relations in the various space-time contexts, from the globalization of the nineteenth century to the one started in the the 1980s;
- educate from the point of view favoring decentralization and to reflect on economic phenomena based on categories of cause/effect, analogy/difference, permanences/changes and on these bases understand and eventually assess;
- raise awareness of the complexities of the process and the variables at stake, considering the role played by economic policies, businesses, the market in promoting or slowing down globalization and the positive or negative effects it can have in different geopolitical areas.
Expected learning outcomes
By the end of the course, students will need to:
- have acquired knowledge of the basic historical and economic concepts, the main dynamics of the economy and the history of globalization in the different space-time contexts;
- know the periodizations, phenomena and key events;
- be able to interpret data and information (including tables and graphs) concerning the history of a given economy, linking facts and phenomena and capturing the interrelationships between the different historical aspects (economic, social, political and institutional);
- be able to apply knowledge and understanding to the analysis of the current process of globalization, expressing adequately argued assessments;
- know how to communicate their knowledge in a clear, coherent and organic way, using the appropriate terminology and discipline-specific concepts.
Course syllabus and organization

Single session

Responsible
Lesson period
First semester
Course syllabus
Globalization: a phenomenon due to the "invisible hand" of the market or driven by the economic policies of the states and the interests of companies? Towards a richer, freer and more equitable world, or a source of inequalities and social problems? The course deals with the complex reality of globalization considering its causes and effects from a historical-economic perspective, from the nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century.

Module A will analyze the nineteenth-century globalization, with the expansion of the international circulation of goods, capital, people. Europe and the competition between states had a decisive role in building a new world economy, which seems to organize itself on the center-periphery model. Several factors contributed to the growing integration: industrialization and the transport revolution, international capital investments, mass migration, but also the forced opening of the markets of China and Japan, the construction of the British Empire, the colonization of Africa. In the last decades of the century, the interconnection of economies also leads to the first deep international depression.

Interrupted by the First World War, the globalization of economies resumed in the second post-war period in a new bipolar world order dominated by the US and the USSR. In this context, Module B will compare the planned to the capitalist economies and will deal with the European and Japanese economic miracles, along with those of the so-called "Asian tigers". The lectures will then examine the crucial transition (from the beginning of the Seventies), from the hegemony of Keynesian economic policies to that of neoliberal theories, which promote a new phase of liberalization of economies.

Module C will concentrate on the last decades of the twentieth century, when Latin American countries, China, India, the former Soviet Union, the European Union, modify their own economic policies towards an ever greater opening to foreign investments and international trade, promoting the development of multinationals (whose size grows enormously) and the financialization of the economy. The new globalization, strengthened since the 1990s by the internet revolution and the extension of neoliberal policies, brings greater well-being for some social groups, but also an increase in inequalities, instability, international financial crises.
Prerequisites for admission
For a successful attendance to the course, the enrolling student should have acquired basic knowledge in Early Modern and Contemporary History. However, this is not a compulsory prerequisite.
Teaching methods
The course topics will be addressed through lectures and with the help of slides and teaching materials (papers, tables, graphs, articles, web links) that the teacher will make available from time to time on the Ariel platform.
Attendance, although not mandatory, is strongly recommended. To be considered attending students, undergraduates must attend at least 24 out of 30 lessons.
Teaching Resources
Examination program for attending students (also Erasmus)
6 CFU exam (Unit A and Unit B); 9 CFU exam (Units A, B and C)

Teaching unit A
- Course notes;
- Teaching materials provided during the lessons and available on the Ariel website;
- AA.VV., Il mondo globale. Una storia economica, Torino, Giappichelli, 2017, pp. 47-197.

Teaching unit B
- Course notes;
- Teaching materials provided during the lessons and available on the Ariel website;
- AA.VV., Il mondo globale. Una storia economica, Torino, Giappichelli, 2017, pp.199-330.

Teaching unit C
- Course notes;
- Teaching materials provided during the lessons and available on the Ariel website:
- Steger M. B., La globalizzazione, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2016, from p. 43 forward.

Examination program for non-attending students
6 CFU exam:
1) AA.VV., Il mondo globale. Una storia economica, Torino, Giappichelli, 2017, together with:
2) Steger M. B., La globalizzazione, Bologna, il Mulino, 2016

9 CFU exam:
1) - AA.VV., Il mondo globale. Una storia economica, Torino, Giappichelli, 2017, together with the following two texts:
2) Steger M. B., La globalizzazione, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2016 and
3) Storia economica globale del mondo contemporaneo (Carlo Fumian and Andrea Giuntini eds.), Carocci, 2019 or (only for those with a background in economy): Gérard Lafay, Capire la globalizzazione, Bologna, il Mulino, 1998.

Program for Erasmus students
If requested, incoming Erasmus students may take the exam in English with the following bibliography (Units 1 and 2, for 6 Ects; Units 1, 2 and 3, for 9 Ects):
1) The Global economy. A concise history, N.Y-Torino, Routledge-Giappichelli, 2019
2) Steger M.B., Globalization. A very short introduction, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2020 (NEW EDITION)
3) Steger M.B, Roy R.K., Neoliberalism. A very short introduction, Oxford-N.Y., Oxford University Press, 2010
Assessment methods and Criteria
Written examination, with four open questions.
The exam lasts two hours.
The teacher will evaluate: clearness; argumentative ability; properness of terminology; completeness; correct space-time orientation; ability to link facts and phenomena.

Attending students
Four open questions for both 6 CFU and 9 CFU, focusing on the topics covered during the class.
Attending students may optionally take an intermediate written test at the end of the teaching unit B, whose evaluation in 30/30 will contribute to determining the final grade of the course. The mid-term exam will consist of four open questions focusing on the topics covered in class and will last two hours. Those who have passed the intermediate test will support (during the scheduled exam sessions) a final exam on Module C only, consisting of two open questions on the topics covered in class.

Non-attending students
Four open questions for both 6 credits and 9 credits, focusing on the texts listed in the program.
Further information on the assessment methods will be available in the Ariel portal of the course.
Unita' didattica A
SECS-P/12 - ECONOMIC HISTORY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica B
SECS-P/12 - ECONOMIC HISTORY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica C
SECS-P/12 - ECONOMIC HISTORY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor(s)
Reception:
This week: 18 January 16-19. Wednesday 16:00-19:00 via Microsoft Teams (please, contact via e-mail the teacher to schedule an appointment))