English III

A.Y. 2019/2020
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
L-LIN/12
Language
English
Learning objectives
The course is conceived to improve knowledge of English in the field of science and academic and professional spheres by introducing the language of science and medicine and professional and business discourses.
Expected learning outcomes
Achievement of level C1 in the four skills:
Acquiring understanding of the specific linguistic characteristics of a variety of text types from the spheres of scientific, medical, technical and professional discourse;
learning to work on specialized texts and to analyse them from a discourse analysis perspective;
learning recognize and reproduce various text types;
learning how to produce oral translations of them.
Course syllabus and organization

A-K

Responsible
Lesson period
year
Course syllabus
Module 1
Scientific English: from theory to practice (semester 1)
An introduction to domain-specific languages: linguistic and discursive features of specialised texts. Comparative analyses of scientific texts, particularly on the strategies adopted in constructing scientific news for circulation at the specialised level. Focus on academic writing strategies, especially on connectors and other textual elements enhancing coherence and cohesion. Practical applications on specific case studies.

Module 2
Mediating specialised discourse in English (semester 1)
An introduction to oral language mediation and dialogue interpreting. Students will learn about the skills and aptitudes interpreters must have to perform dialogue interpreting, the ethical standards they have to abide by, and the role of the interpreter as a linguistic and intercultural mediator. They will also learn to analyse oral dialogic discourse in English and in Italian and to translate it, with pragmatic appropriateness and terminological / professional accuracy. They will also be given the opportunity to practice oral and written language mediation in small seminars.

Module 3
Knowledge dissemination through the traditional print media and the Internet (semester 2)
This module focuses on how information and views about science and technology are spread to and shared with lay readers through the mainstream print media, non-fiction publications and on the Internet in a variety of online modalities. During lessons comparisons will be made between the linguistic aspects involved. in conveying scientific information in the traditional print media (newspapers and non-fiction works) and in internet modalities (e.g., blogs, vlogs). Lessons will also include close linguistic analysis and comment of a selection of representative mainstream print and Internet genres, accompanied by related activities and tasks.
Prerequisites for admission
The course builds on the competences developed in the second-year English language course (B2+/C1- level of the CEFR). A working knowledge of Italian is also required. The exit level is set at C1 of the CEFR.
Teaching methods
The teaching methods used will draw from applied functional linguistics, especially from the English-speaking tradition. In particular, the methods will include theoretical notions on lexicon and syntax, textual genres, cohesion and coherence, and discourse analysis.
Teaching Resources
Module 1
Set textbooks
- G. Garzone, Perspectives on ESP and popularization, CUEM, Milano, chapters 1-5.
and the following essays for the oral exam, which will be made available on the course's Ariel platform:
- Gotti, M. 2011. Insights into medical discourse in oral and written contexts. In A. Loiacono, G. Iamartino, K. Grego (eds.). Teaching Medical English: Methods and Models. Monza: Polimetrica, pp.29-55.
- Grego, K. 2013. 'The physics you buy in supermarkets'. Writing science for the general public: the case of Stephen Hawkings. In S. Kermas, T. Christiansen (eds). The popularization of specialized discourse and knowledge across communities and cultures. Bari: Edipuglia, p. 149-172.
- Handouts and PPT presentations used in class.

Module 2
Set textbook:
- G. Garzone, M. Rudvin, Domain-Specific English and Language Mediation in Professional and Institutional Settings, Milano, Arcipelago Edizioni, 2003 (and in particular: Introduction: from Conference interpreting to dialogue interpreting, pp. 3-23; Chapter II: The interpreter's role in the business environment, pp. 78-109; Chapter III: Interpreting for public services: some institutional, professional and intercultural aspects, pp. 117-183; Chapter IV: Cross-Cultural Issues in Community Interpreting, pp. 185-205), but knowledge of the whole volume will be taken for granted: students can (re-)read the whole textbook to review notions already learnt in the English 1 and English 2 courses.
- Course pack, including articles and authentic texts and transcripts, available on the course's Ariel platform.
- Handouts and PPT presentations used in class.

Module 3
Set texts
- Pilkington, Olga.2019. The Language of Popular Science: Analyzing the Communication of Advanced Ideas to Lay Readers. McFarland: Jefferson North Carolina (available in Kindle format for 16 euros on amazon.it).
- Calsamiglia, Helena and Carmen Lopez Ferreo.2003. "Role and position of scientific voices: reported speech in the media. Discourse Studies. Vol 5(2): 147-173 (copy uploaded in critical reading folder).
- Garzone, Giuliana. 2014. "News Production and Scientific Knowledge: Exploring Popularization as a Process" (copy uploaded in critical reading folder).

Set Text for language lessons (Esercitazioni)
- The Official Cambridge Guide to IELTS: for academic and general training, Pauline Cullen, Amanda French and Vanessa Jakeman. Cambridge University Press.
- IELTS Language Practice. Michael Vice and Amanda French. Macmillan.
Assessment methods and Criteria
EVALUATION
Assessment is exam-based. Prior to sitting the final oral examination with one of the course subject professors, students will have to pass two preliminary language skills tests and a course-content test covering the contents of all three teaching units.
PRELIMINARY LANGUAGE SKILLS TESTS
Written test
This written test is composed of two parts.
The first part (45 minutes) involves the completion of a test on textual structure and cohesion. This part of the exam tests students' grammar skills. For this part, no dictionary or other tools are allowed.
The second part (60 minutes) involves writing a short essay (about 250 words) on a specialised subject. In order to complete the task, students may be required to use the data and information contained in tables, graphs and/or texts (in either English or Italian) provided with the task. For this part, the use of a monolingual dictionary is allowed.
Oral test
The oral test is comprised of two parts: 1) the mini-presentation, and 2) the oral mediation.
Mini presentation format:
Normally students are tested in pairs.
The examiner gives the first student a card with three questions written on it and s/he has one minute to choose which of the questions s/he wants to talk about. Then the student gives his/her presentation lasting 2 minutes. After the first student has spoken, the second student has to ask him/her a question related to the content of the presentation. This procedure is repeated, so that the second student receives a card and speaks for 2 minutes and a follow-up question is asked.
The examiner may ask some further questions.
Oral mediation format:
Normally students are tested in small groups.
They are given different roles to play, e.g. the doctor, the patient and the mediator. They have to play their respective role in the required language, with the mediator interpreting for the other two roles. Students then switch roles.
COURSE CONTENT ASSESSMENT
Course content written test
Each unit (1, 2 & 3) involves a computer-based content test, which must be passed in order to sit the final oral examination. These tests can be taken during official appelli orali, or in the form of unofficial end-of-term tests, ideally during the final lesson of each unit.
Final oral exam
Only students who have passed their course content tests and the preliminary language written and oral tests (either as end-of-term tests or the days when oral exams are administered) will be able to sit the final oral exam. The final exam will consist in an oral exam with one of the course subject professors, who will award the final mark considering the marks obtained by the student in all the different tests, in particular those regarding course content. Students must be prepared to discuss critically and in detail one of the articles or book chapters included in the set texts for each unit, and prove that they have mastered the concepts covered during the course and can talk about them in a linguistically correct and academically appropriate manner.
All marks are valid for four exam sessions, including the one in which they were obtained.
Teaching Unit 1
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor: Grego Kim Serena
Teaching Unit 2
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor: Rudvin Mette
Teaching Unit 3
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours

L-Z

Responsible
Lesson period
year
Course syllabus
UNIT 1. Scientific English: from theory to practice (Prof. K. Grego)
An introduction to domain-specific languages: linguistic and discursive features of specialised texts. Comparative analyses of scientific texts, particularly on the strategies adopted in constructing scientific news for circulation at the specialised level. Focus on academic writing strategies, especially on connectors and other textual elements enhancing coherence and cohesion. Practical applications on specific case studies.
UNIT 2. Mediating specialised discourse in English
An introduction to oral language mediation and dialogue interpreting. Students will learn about the skills and aptitudes interpreters must have to perform dialogue interpreting, the ethical standards they have to abide by, and the role of the interpreter as a linguistic and intercultural mediator. They will also learn to analyse oral dialogic discourse in English and in Italian and to translate it, with pragmatic appropriateness and terminological / professional accuracy. They will also be given the opportunity to practice oral and written language mediation in small seminars.
UNIT 3. Knowledge dissemination through the traditional print media and the Internet (Prof. D. Heaney)
Teaching Unit 3 focuses on how information and views about science and technology are spread and shared through the medium of English both in the mainstream print media and on the Internet in a variety of written and oral online modalities. There will be a comparison between the linguistic aspects involved in conveying scientific information in the traditional print media and those that have emerged in internet modalities. The lessons will include linguistic analysis and comment on various mainstream print and Internet print and audio-visual genres accompanied by related activities and tasks.
Prerequisites for admission
The course builds on the competences developed in the second-year English language course (B2+/C1- level of the CEFR).
Teaching methods
teaching units: lessons
language and oral mediation: language practice sesssions
Teaching Resources
Unit 1:
· - G. Garzone, Perspectives on ESP and popularization, CUEM, Milano, chapters 1-5.
· and the following essays for the oral exam, which will be made available on the course's webpage:
· - Gotti, M. 2011. Insights into medical discourse in oral and written contexts. In A. Loiacono, G. Iamartino, K. Grego (eds.). Teaching Medical English: Methods and Models. Monza: Polimetrica, pp.29-55.
· - Grego, K. 2013. 'The physics you buy in supermarkets'. Writing science for the general public: the case of Stephen Hawkings. In S. Kermas, T. Christiansen (eds). The popularization of specialized discourse and knowledge across communities and cultures. Bari: Edipuglia, p. 149-172.
· Powerpoints and related texts used during lessons
Unit 2:
· G. Garzone, M. Rudvin, Domain-Specific English and Language Mediation in Professional and Institutional Settings, Milano, Arcipelago Edizioni, 2003 (and in particular:
· Introduction: from Conference interpreting to dialogue interpreting, pp. 3-23;
· Chapter II: The interpreter's role in the business environment, pp. 78-109;
· Chapter III: Interpreting for public services: some institutional, professional and intercultural aspects, pp. 117-183;
· Chapter IV: Cross-Cultural Issues in Community Interpreting, pp. 185-205).
· However, knowledge of the whole volume will be taken for granted: students can (re-)read the whole textbook to review notions already learnt in the English 1 and English 2 courses).
· Course pack, including articles and authentic texts and transcripts, available on the course website.
· Powerpoints and related texts used during lessons

Unit 3:
· Pilkington, Olga.2019. The Language of Popular Science: Analyzing the Communication of Advanced Ideas to Lay Readers. McFarland: Jefferson North Carolina. (available in kindle format for 16 euros amazon.it)
· Calsamiglia, Helena and Carmen Lopez Ferreo.2003. "Role and position of scientific voices: reported speech in the media. Discourse Studies. Vol 5(2): 147-173. (Copy uploaded in critical reading folder)
· Garzone, Giuliana. 2014. "News Production and Scientific Knowledge: Exploring Popularization as a Process". (Copy uploaded in critical reading folder)
· - G. Garzone, Perspectives on ESP and popularization, CUEM, Milano, chapter 6.
· Powerpoints and related texts used during lessons
Assessment methods and Criteria
The exam is structured as follows:
Written English language exam:
· writing a short text on a specialised subject. To complete the task, students may be required to use the data and information contained in tables, graphs and/or texts (in either English or Italian) provided with the task. For this part, the use of a monolingual dictionary is allowed;
· completion of a test on textual structure and cohesion. This part of the exam tests students' grammar skills and understanding of textual cohesion. For this part, no dictionary is allowed;
· The oral test is comprised of two parts:
· mini-presentation: the student has to speak for about 2 minutes about one of three possible topics indicated by the examiner. The student is also expected to ask and answer questions (to and from other candidates) in the course of the presentation;

· Oral mediation: students perform the role of mediator in a mediation scenarioindicated by the examiner..


· Final oral exam: students who have passed all the above exam components will be able to sit the final oral exam. Students must be prepared to discuss critically and in detail one of the(6) set texts indicated for the didactic units (2 for each unit) and prove that they have mastered the concepts covered during the course and can talk about them in a linguistically correct and academically appropriate manner.
Teaching Unit 1
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor: Grego Kim Serena
Teaching Unit 2
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor: Rudvin Mette
Teaching Unit 3
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor(s)
Reception:
Wed. 4 Nov., 11 a.m., on Teams
Please book an appointment by clicking on the link below.