English for international relations

A.Y. 2019/2020
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
L-LIN/12
Language
English
Learning objectives
The course aims to provide students with an understanding of the language of political discourse in English. The course involves the close analysis of both of authentic political speeches and documents and press coverage of international affairs. The material will be also analysed in the light of theories on persuasion, communicative functions and the concepts of face and politeness.
Expected learning outcomes
The course is expected to develop: the overall ability to understand the fundamental ideas of complex texts about factual or abstract matters, including technical texts from the area of specialization (English for International Relations); the ability to understand oral discourse of a certain length and to follow a speakers arguments on a relatively familiar topic (English for International Relations); the ability to understand current affairs texts in which the author takes a positions or argues for a certain point of view (in the sphere of English for International Relations); the familiarity with some concepts and theories that underlie linguistic analysis of political discourse.
Course syllabus and organization

A-K

Responsible
Lesson period
Third trimester
Course syllabus
The course centres on international political communication in English and introduces the topics, genres, registers, linguistic features, persuasive and rhetorical techniques and lexis typical of this discourse. The relationship between international politics and the media is also examined as reflected in established genres and the structure and style of journalistic discourse and their role in the representation of current international political issues.
Prerequisites for admission
The entry level in the English language is B2 of the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference).
Teaching methods
Lessons are taught in the English language and are characterised by the application of the theoretical aspects of the course to the analysis of genres, topics, and language relating to international relations both in political discourse and the media.
Teaching Resources
Course Handout. D. Heaney, The Discourse of International Relations in English. A selection of texts, a. a.2019-2020. This contains authentic texts for study and analysis and grammar and lexical exercises intended to help students prepare for the exam.

Powerpoint files for modules 1,2,3 - download from the Ariel platform: http://dheaneyeir.ariel.ctu.unimi.it/v3/Home/

Set texts
A. Partington, (2018) The Language of Persuasion in Politics. London : Routledge (the whole volume)

C. M. de B. Clark (2006) Views in the news. A textbook, Milano, LED. (the whole volume)

Critical essays:

◦Graham, P., Keenan, T. and Dowd A.M. (2004) "A call to arms at the end of history: a discourse-historical analysis of George W. Bush's declaration of war on terror", Discourse & Society, vol 15 (2-3): 199-221.

◦Trosborg, A. (2000) The inaugural address, in Bhatia V.K. (ed.) Analysing Professional Genres, Amsterdam,
John Benjamin, pp. 121-144.

◦Koosha, M. / Shams, M. R. (2005). "A Critical Study of News Discourse: Iran's Nuclear Issue in the British Newspapers". IJAL (Iranian Journal of Applied Linguistics) 8: 107-141.

◦Mautner, G. (2008) "Analyzing Newspapers, Magazines and other Print Media", in Wodak, R. / Krzyzanowski M. (eds) Qualitative Discourse Analysis in the Social Sciences. Basingstoke. Palgrave Macmillan: 30-53


In addition to the language practice exercises in the course handout, the following grammar is recommended:

Murphy, R. English Grammar in Use. Third Edition, Cambridge University Press.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The exam is written and tests students' knowledge of the contents and information in the course handout and the theoretical and linguistic aspects of the course programme covered in the lesson and set texts.
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours

L-Z

Responsible
Lesson period
Third trimester
Course syllabus
Module 1
International Political Communication in English
International political communication in English: themes, genres, registers, methods of speech and characteristic lexical uses. Analysis of some political speeches representative of different textual genres and highlights of recent history.

Module 2
International Politics and the Media
Politics and the media. Textual genres and linguistic structures of journalistic discourse, processes of representation of international politics, lexicon referring to current affairs with reference to international relations.

Module 3
International Political Issues
Case studies on international political and commercial issues. Analysis of official and popular texts produced by international organizations or mediated through the press.
Prerequisites for admission
Entry level required: B1 of the CEFR (Common European Framework of Reference of the Council of Europe), that is: ability to understand the key points of familiar topics concerning work, school, leisure time, etc. Can deal with most situations likely to arise while travelling in an area where the language is spoken.
Teaching methods
The teaching methods used will draw from applied functional linguistics, especially from the English-speaking tradition. Classes will be taught in English.
Teaching Resources
Collection of texts (dispensa):
- D. Heaney, The Discourse of International Relations in English. A selection of texts, a.a. 2019-2020, which contains authentic texts to study and analyse and grammar exercises aimed at preparing for the exam.
- Slides relating to modules 1, 2, 3, downloadable from the Ariel platform.
Textbooks:
- A. Partington, (2018) The Language of Persuasion in Politics. London: Routledge (to be studied entirely).
- C. M. de B. Clark (2006) Views in the news. A textbook, Milano, LED (to be studied entirely).

Critical readings:
- Graham, P., Keenan, T. and Dowd A.M. (2004) "A call to arms at the end of history: a discourse-historical analysis of George W. Bush's declaration of war on terror", Discourse & Society, vol 15 (2-3): 199-221.
- Trosborg, A. (2000) The inaugural address, in Bhatia V.K. (ed.) Analysing Professional Genres, Amsterdam, John Benjamin, pp. 121-144.
- Koosha, M. / Shams, M. R. (2005). "A Critical Study of News Discourse: Iran's Nuclear Issue in the British Newspapers". IJAL (Iranian Journal of Applied Linguistics) 8: 107-141.
- Mautner, G. (2008) "Analyzing Newspapers, Magazines and other Print Media", in Wodak, R. / Krzyzanowski M. (eds) Qualitative Discourse Analysis in the Social Sciences. Basingstoke. Palgrave Macmillan: 30-53.

In addition to a series of exercises included in the lecture ("Language practice"), the recommended grammar is:
- Murphy, R. English Grammar in Use. Third Edition, Cambridge University Press.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The exam is written and based on the contents and information present in the collection of texts provided and the theoretical and linguistic contents covered in the three modules of the course and in the texts adopted. It is structured as follows:
Content of collection of texts:
- questions on the topics covered in the lecture notes.
Theoretical contents of the modules:
- questions on linguistic varieties, discursive and rhetorical structures of political and journalistic discourse, specialized lexicon with reference to the texts in the collection and critical readings.
Language skills and abilities:
- oral comprehension (listening comprehension),
- grammar skills.
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Professor: Grego Kim Serena
Professor(s)
Reception:
Wed. 4 Nov., 11 a.m., on Teams
Please book an appointment by clicking on the link below.