English 2

A.Y. 2020/2021
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
L-LIN/12
Language
English
Learning objectives
The course is aimed at second-year BA students. It consists of lectures (Corso Monografico) and practical language classes (Esercitazioni). Corso Monografico aims to provide students with advanced-level theoretical tools to consolidate their implicit and explicit knowledge of English phonetics/phonology and English lexicogrammar and to carry out English/Italian comparative/contrastive analyses. Aspects of syntactic change and phonological variation in 21st century English are also addressed. Esercitazioni aim to develop students' receptive and productive skills in English at an advanced level.
Expected learning outcomes
Knowledge and understanding: the notion of lexicogrammatical 'construction' and the syntactic and semantic features of the main English lexicogrammatical constructions; the main syntactic changes taking place in 21st century English; phonological variation: main accents of 21st century English.
Applying knowledge and understanding: Corso monografico: students need to be able to a. identify in texts of different types and analyse metalinguistically the main English lexicogrammatical constructions; b. carry out English/Italian comparative/contrastive analyses of the syntactic and semantic features of constructions; c. identify/reproduce the main phonological features of a sample English regional accents; d. consult online corpora and concordancers. Esercitazioni. Students need to be able to a. listen to academic talks and take notes; b. engage in monologues (presentations) and dialogues on current affairs issues, presenting their points of view and arguing their opinions; c. write short academic essays on a wide range of topics, arguing against or in favour a claim/position."
Course syllabus and organization

(A-K)

Responsible
Lesson period
year
Teaching methods
Lectures will be held in a synchronous mode through Microsoft Teams or Zoom.
Course syllabus/bibliography
No changes will be made to the course syllabus and the bibliography.
Assessment methods criteria
Corso monografico exam will be held in a distance/online format through Microsoft Teams. The two preliminary written tests will be replaced by two oral tests.
Esercitazioni oral and written exams will take place in a distance/online format through Microsoft Teams and Zoom. The written test will last 60 minutes and will consist of a 250-word essay.
Course syllabus
The course (Seeing through 21st century English) is made up of three main parts
Part 1: English Lexicogrammatical Constructions (A. Nava)
Part 2: Phonological variation: regional accents of English (A. Nava)
Part 3: Lexicogrammatical constructions in context (L. Berti)
Part 1 will introduce the concept of 'lexicogrammatical construction' and analyze the main English phrasal and clause constructions. Part 2 will focus on key aspects of phonological variation in English, with reference to the main regional accents of 21st century English (Accents of the British Isles, General American, World Accent varieties). In Part 3 students will carry out metalinguistic and contrastive/comparative analyses of lexicogrammatical constructions in a sample of authentic texts.
The course syllabus is valid until February 2022.
Prerequisites for admission
The course is held entirely in English. Students are expected to have a Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Learning, Teaching, Assessment (CEFR) B2 proficiency level in English to be able to take part in the teaching activities and to complete the assignments.
Teaching methods
The course adopts the following learning and teaching methods:
-interactive lectures/theoretical input sessions
- tasks: metalinguistic and contrastive analysis, Italian-English translation
The course also features practical language classes (see esercitazioni description).
Teaching Resources
The course website (https://anavali2.ariel.ctu.unimi.it/v5/home/Default.aspx), which is hosted on the university's Ariel platform, features lesson handouts and notes and further teaching and learning materials.
The reading list for the course is provided below:
Depraetere, I. and C. Langford. 2019. Advanced English Grammar. A Linguistic Approach. Second edition. London: Bloomsbury.
Celce-Murcia, M. and D. Larsen-Freeman. 2015. The Grammar Book. An ESL/EFL Teacher's Course. Third edition. Boston: Heinle (pp. 359-361)
Collins, B. S. and I. M. Mees. 2013. Practical Phonetics and Phonology. A Resource Book for Students. Third edition. London: Routledge (pp. 2-9; 156-199, 286-294).
Cowan, R. 2008. The Teacher's Grammar of English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp. 330-339; pp. 396-397; pp. 404-405; pp. 408-409; pp. 471-484).
Mair, C. and G. Leech. 2006. Current changes in English syntax. In B. Aarts and A. McMahon (eds). The Handbook of English Linguistics. Oxford: Blackwell (pp. 318-342).
O'Dell, F. and M. McCarthy. 2008. English Collocations in Use. Advanced. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Wierzbicka, A. 2006. English: Meaning and Culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press (pp. 171-183).

Students who are unable to attend the course are strongly encouraged to contact the course lecturers during their office hours.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The course (lectures and practical language classes) is assessed through both written and oral tests.
50% of the overall exam mark (out of 30) is allocated to the lectures and 50% to the practical language classes.
Lectures
Students are required to take a written test and an oral test. The written test is made up of open questions, metalinguistic analysis tasks and Italian-English translations of sentences. Students who attend the course regularly may opt to take two mid-term tests instead of the final written test.
The oral test requires students to present a portfolio of ten 600-word English texts. The texts making up each student's portfolio may be drawn from newpaper articles, contemporary fiction, TV series or film scripts.
Students will need to be able to-
- read the texts aloud with correct pronunciation
- translate the texts into Italian
- identify in the texts examples of the lexicogrammatical features dealt with during the course and carry out English/Italian contrastive/comparative analyses.



Pratical language classes:
The written test lasts 170 minutes and is made up of three sections:
1. Listening comprehension
Students listen to a monologue or an interview twice and answer questions (gap fill or short answers required).
2. Written Cloze Test
Students read a newspaper article and fill in 30 gaps in the text.
3. Essay Writing
Students write a 350 word essay.
No dictionaries are allowed to be used when taking any section of the written test.
A mark out of 30 will be allocated to each of the three sections of the test. To pass the test, the average of the three marks has to be 18/30 or higher. For at least two parts of the test, students are required to obtain a mark of 18/30 or higher.
The writing section of the exam will be evaluated according to the following criteria:
text and paragraph structure, cohesion, morphology and syntax, lexis, use of appropriate register.

The oral test requires students to deliver a presentation and to engage in an interview. The 8-10 minute presentation will focus on a topic chosen by the student (out of the issues dealt with during the practical language classes). A short interview with an examiner will follow the student presentation. Students' oral performance will be assessed in terms of lexicogrammatical and phonetic/phonological accuracy, oral fluency and ability to present and argue specific opinions and points of view.
Student who attend the practical language classes regularly may opt to take two oral and written mid-term assessment tests instead of the final oral and written tests.

International or Erasmus incoming students are required to contact the course lecturers as soon as possible. Alternative assessment methods for SEN and disabled students will have to be arranged with the course lecturers and the University Disability Office.
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Professors: Berti Lucia, Nava Andrea

(L-Z)

Responsible
Lesson period
year
Teaching methods
Lectures will be held in a synchronous mode through Microsoft Teams or Zoom.
Course syllabus/bibliography
No changes will be made to the course syllabus and the bibliography.
Assessment methods criteria
Corso monografico exam will be held in a distance/online format through Microsoft Teams. The two preliminary written tests will be replaced by two oral tests.
Esercitazioni oral and written exams will take place in a distance/online format through Microsoft Teams and Zoom. The written test will last 60 minutes and will consist of a 250-word essay.
Course syllabus
The course (Seeing through 21st century English) is made up of three parts:
Part 1: English Lexicogrammatical Constructions (A. Nava)
Part 2: Phonological variation: regional accents of English (A. Nava)
Part 3: Lexicogrammatical constructions in context (L. Berti)
Part 1 will introduce the concept of 'lexicogrammatical construction' and analyze the main English phrasal and clause constructions. Part 2 will focus on key aspects of phonological variation in English, with reference to the main regional accents of 21st century English (Accents of the British Isles, General American, World Accent varieties). In Part 3 students will carry out metalinguistic and contrastive/comparative analyses of lexicogrammatical constructions in a sample of authentic texts.
The course syllabus is valid until February 2022.
Prerequisites for admission
The course is held entirely in English. Students are expected to have a Common European Framework of Reference for Languages. Learning, Teaching, Assessment (CEFR) B2 proficiency level in English to be able to take part in the teaching activities and to complete the assignments.
Teaching methods
The course adopts the following learning and teaching methods:
-interactive lectures/theoretical input sessions
- tasks: metalinguistic and contrastive analysis, Italian-English translation
The course also features practical language classes (see esercitazioni description).
Teaching Resources
The course website (https://anavali2.ariel.ctu.unimi.it/v5/home/Default.aspx), which is hosted on the university's Ariel platform, features lesson handouts and notes and further teaching and learning materials.
The reading list for the course is provided below:
Depraetere, I. and C. Langford. 2019. Advanced English Grammar. A Linguistic Approach. Second edition. London: Bloomsbury.
Celce-Murcia, M. and D. Larsen-Freeman. 2015. The Grammar Book. An ESL/EFL Teacher's Course. Third edition. Boston: Heinle (pp. 359-361)
Collins, B. S. and I. M. Mees. 2013. Practical Phonetics and Phonology. A Resource Book for Students. Third edition. London: Routledge (pp. 2-9; 156-199, 286-294).
Cowan, R. 2008. The Teacher's Grammar of English. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press (pp. 330-339; pp. 396-397; pp. 404-405; pp. 408-409; pp. 471-484).
Mair, C. and G. Leech. 2006. Current changes in English syntax. In B. Aarts and A. McMahon (eds). The Handbook of English Linguistics. Oxford: Blackwell (pp. 318-342).
O'Dell, F. and M. McCarthy. 2008. English Collocations in Use. Advanced. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Wierzbicka, A. 2006. English: Meaning and Culture. Oxford: Oxford University Press (pp. 171-183).
Students who are unable to attend the course are strongly encouraged to contact the course lecturers during their office hours.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The course (lectures and practical language classes) is assessed through both written and oral tests.
50% of the overall exam mark (out of 30) is allocated to the lectures and 50% to the practical language classes.
Lectures:
Students are required to take a written test and an oral test. The written test is made up of open questions, metalinguistic analysis tasks and Italian-English translations of sentences. Students who attend the course regularly may opt to take two mid-term tests instead of the final written test.
The oral test requires students to present a portfolio of ten 600-word English texts. The texts making up each student's portfolio may be drawn from newpaper articles, contemporary fiction, TV series or film scripts.
Students will need to be able to-
- read the texts aloud with correct pronunciation
- translate the texts into Italian
- identify in the texts examples of the lexicogrammatical features dealt with during the course and carry out English/Italian contrastive/comparative analyses.



Pratical language classes:
The written test lasts 170 minutes and is made up of three sections:
1. Listening comprehension
Students listen to a monologue or an interview twice and answer questions (gap fill or short answers required).
2. Written Cloze Test
Students read a newspaper article and fill in 30 gaps in the text.
3. Essay Writing
Students write a 350 word essay.
No dictionaries are allowed to be used when taking any section of the written test.
A mark out of 30 will be allocated to each of the three sections of the test. To pass the test, the average of the three marks has to be 18/30 or higher. For at least two parts of the test, students are required to obtain a mark of 18/30 or higher.
The writing section of the exam will be evaluated according to the following criteria:
text and paragraph structure, cohesion, morphology and syntax, lexis, use of appropriate register.

The oral test requires students to deliver a presentation and to engage in an interview. The 8-10 minute presentation will focus on a topic chosen by the student (out of the issues dealt with during the practical language classes). A short interview with an examiner will follow the student presentation. Students' oral performance will be assessed in terms of lexicogrammatical and phonetic/phonological accuracy, oral fluency and ability to present and argue specific opinions and points of view.
Student who attend the practical language classes regularly may opt to take two oral and written mid-term assessment tests instead of the final oral and written tests.

International or Erasmus incoming students are required to contact the course lecturers as soon as possible. Alternative assessment methods for SEN and disabled students will have to be arranged with the course lecturers and the University Disability Office.
L-LIN/12 - LANGUAGE AND TRANSLATION - ENGLISH - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Professors: Berti Lucia, Nava Andrea
Professor(s)