Slavic philology

A.Y. 2020/2021
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
L-LIN/21
Language
Italian
Learning objectives
This course explores the premodern linguistic and cultural history of the Slavic people, with a special emphasis on their interactions during the ancient and medieval periods. One of the main goals of this course is to provide a thorough understanding of Old Slavonic, the common written language of the Orthodox Slav world, through the study of its grammar and the reading of at least two texts written in this language.
Expected learning outcomes
Knowledge and understanding: knowledge of the historical and cultural context of the development of the oldest Slavic civilization, analyzed from a comparative perspective; knowledge of the origin, evolution, and classification of the Slavic languages; knowledge of the grammar of Old Slavonic. Applying knowledge and understanding: ability to read, translate, and grammatically parse a text in Old Slavonic; ability to interpret and comment on an Old Slavonic text within its cultural and historical framework.
Course syllabus and organization

Single session

Lesson period
Second semester
Teaching Methods:
Classes will be taught online using Microsoft Teams. Students can either follow them in real time via video streaming or catch up with them later as every class will be recorded and uploaded on Microsoft Teams.

Course syllabus
The syllabus will remain unchanged

Evaluation
Students are assessed by oral examination on Microsoft Teams. The oral examination is structured as follows:
- Questions on the historical, cultural, and political background studied in Unit A
- Linguistic analysis of an Old Church Slavonic text read in class in Unit B
- Linguistic and literary analysis of a text read in class during Unit C
Course syllabus
The course consists of three parts:
A: An introduction to premodern Slavonic cultural and political history
B: An elementary grammar of Old Church Slavonic
C: The fool in Christ (iurodivyi): the East Slavic Vita of Andrew of Constantinople

Part A explores premodern Slavic cultural and political history, tracing the spread of Church Slavonic as the language of Orthodox Slavdom. Part B is dedicated to analysing the sound and grammatical structure—the phonology and morphology—of Old Church Slavonic and reading texts written in this language. Part C charts the development of a peculiar form of Eastern Orthodox ascetism known as "foolishness for Christ" (iurodstvo).

Students who want to take 6 credits are required to attend parts A-B. Those who want to take 9 credits are required to attend parts A-B-C. The program is valid until July 2022.
Prerequisites for admission
Students enrolled in the BA Program in Foreign Languages must have succesfully completed the Glottology course. A basic knowledge of at least one Slavic language is recommended. Students enrolled in other BA or MA programs are invited to contact the lecturer to determine appropriate syllabus accomodations. Erasmus students with a basic knowledge of one Slavic language are encouraged to attend the course.
Teaching methods
The course is taught through weekly lectures. Lectures include reading and grammatical analysis of Old Church Slavonic texts and student presentations on specific cultural topics.
Teaching Resources
Most course materials, including texts for discussion in class, are available on the Ariel site (https://mbartolinifs.ariel.ctu.unimi.it)


Part A:
Marcello Garzaniti, Gli slavi. Storia, culture e lingue dalle origini ai giorni nostri, Carocci 2019, pp. 21-78, 111-286.

Part B:
Codex Marianus (John 17, 1-6).

N. Marcialis, Introduzione alla lingua paleoslava, Firenze 2005 (o edizioni successive), pp. 3-197.


Part C:
Sergei Ivanov, Holy Fools in Byzantium and Beyond, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006.
Andrei Moldovan, Zitie Andreja Jurodivogo v slavjanskoj pismennosti, Moscow 2000
Assessment methods and Criteria
Students are assessed by oral examination at the end of the course. The oral examination is structured as follows:
- Questions on the historical, cultural, and political background studied in part A
- Linguistic analysis of an Old Church Slavonic text read in class in part B
- Linguistic and literary analysis of a text read in class during part C
Erasmus students are invited to contact the professor via email or during her office hours. Disabled students and students with specific learning disabilities should determine appropriate assessment accomodations together with the lecturer and the University services for disabled students.
Unita' didattica A
L-LIN/21 - SLAVIC STUDIES - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica B
L-LIN/21 - SLAVIC STUDIES - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica C
L-LIN/21 - SLAVIC STUDIES - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours