Zoology

A.Y. 2020/2021
12
Max ECTS
100
Overall hours
SSD
BIO/05
Language
Italian
Learning objectives
The objectives of the teaching are to provide basic knowledge on animal organisms related to functional biology, evolutionary biology, biodiversity, systematics and phylogeny. In particular, the teaching aims to provide students with appropriate competences and notions related to unitarity and complexity of animal life, structural and functional adaptations correlated to different environments, evolutionary history and phylogenetic relationships among animal groups, as well as to zoological terminology. Finally, a further educational goal is to provide methodological skills related to identification of taxa, sampling and collection techniques, comparative analysis of macro- and microscopic anatomy and employment of specific instruments.
Expected learning outcomes
At the end of the teaching the student should have acquired an appropriate basic knowledge of animal organisms and be able to employ the related terminology and to use specific methodological skills (identification of animal taxa, sampling and collection techniques, comparative analysis of macro and microscopic anatomy). In particular, the activities that will define the development of these skills are represented by the extensive employment of real life documents presented during lectures and more specifically by practical labs that will allow the student to also acquire an indispensable manual skill for progressing in his university and professional career.
Course syllabus and organization

A - L

Responsible
Lesson period
year
Lectures of general zoology will be provided in synchronous mode on Microsoft Teams platform according to the first semester timetable. Lectures will be recorded and available for the students in asynchronous mode on the same platform. Every week 4 hours of synchronous tutoring will be offered to the students and dedicated to specific questions and problems. Power point presentations will be also available on the dedicated Ariel site.
Lessons of systematic zoology in asynchronous mode will be provided to the students in form of synthetic videos with audio comments uploaded on the Ariel site. Synchronous lectures will be dedicated to discussion of asynchronous contents: they will be provided according to the second semester timetable using Teams platform and recorded to allow an asynchronous use.
Synchronous and asynchronous lectures will be provided by employing slides and/or videos. In addition, the students will attend 6 practical activities consisting of guided observations and descriptions of preserved animals.
Course syllabus
Part one: general zoology
Fundamental principles of animal life. Body architecture, structures and main functions.
Nutrition; respiration; circulation; homeostasis (excretion, osmoregulation, thermoregulation); protection and support; movement and locomotion; nervous system and sensory receptors; endocrine system. Reproduction: modalities, significance and implications. Embryonic and post-embryonic development.
Animals and environment. Animal adaptations to different environments and life styles.
Inter-specific and intra-specific interactions: competition, predation, symbiosis, parasitism.
Principles of zoological nomenclature, criteria of classification and the identification of the organisms.

Part two: systematic zoology
Introduction to animal systematic.
Description of the principal morphological characters of the Classes, with attention to characters useful to formulate a classification at the level of subclasses and only for Insect and vertebrates at level of Order.
Protozoa: origin, form and function, reproduction and life cycle.
Introduction to Metazoa: origin of complexity, body size, transport and metabolism. Systematic of Porifera, ground plan and water pumping system.
Intoduction to Protostomia
Diploblastic animals: The Cnidarians, symmetry and systematic.
Introduction to triploblastic bilaterians origin, cephalisation, musculature, movement, , targeting resources, physiological specialization.
Lophotrochozoa:
Systematic of Platyhelminthes: Turbellaria and Neodermata. Regeneration, life cycle and parasitism.
Systematic of Rotifera Acanthocephala and Nemertea .
Ground plan of Mollusca: mantel, shell, mantel cavity, foot and coelom.
Systematic of Gastropoda, Cephalopoda, Bivalvia , Scaphopoda.
Ground plan of Annelida: Segmentation, musculature and locomotion. Systematic of Polichaeta and, Clitellata.
Ground plan of Lophophorata, Systematic of Bryozoa and Brachiopoda
Ecdisozoa:
Ground plan and systematic of Nematoda and Nematomorpha.
Ground plan of Arthopoda: origin, exoskeleton, functional morphology, sense organs, excretion, gas exchanges.
Systematic of Chelicerata , Crustacea, Myriapoda, Hexapoda, principal Orders of Insects.
Introduction to Deuterostomia. Ground plan of Echinodermata: water-vascular system, symmetry,. Systematic of Echinodermata.
Ground plan of Chordata, notochord, skeleton, musculature, pharynx, sense organs.
Sistematic of Tunicata and Cephalochordata.
Ground plan and systematic of vertebrates.
Prerequisites for admission
No prerequisite is required
Teaching methods
Teaching modalities are based on frontal lectures supported by Power Point presentations originally produced by the teacher. Students are invited to actively participate with informal questions and/or comments related to the treated topics in order to acquire critical capacities. The frontal lectures are complemented by a series of practical labs focused on the analysis of functional anatomy of some representative models of the main phyla. They consist of: microscopical observations of specimens, in vivo observations, dissections of model-animals. Course attendance is highly recommended.
Teaching Resources
Text books:
Zoologia (parte generale e sistematica), Autori vari, Idelson Gnocchi
Diversità Animale , Cleveland, Hickman, et al. , McGraw-Hill IV ed XV
Atlante di diversità e morfologia degli invertebrati, Sabelli, Piccin
Zoology, Miller and Harley, McGraw Hill.
Moreover, the students have access to both the digital form of the slides presented during the frontal lectures and the illustration of the practical activities on the website ARIEL.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The exams will consist of:
1- An intermediate oral exam at the end of the course first part. The evaluation criteria include: the degree of acquired knowledge (the student should be able to describe the different animal structures and functions and the relationship with the environment), the ability to appropriately present the topics, the use of a correct terminology.
2- Terminal multiple choice test consisting in 30 questions regarding systematic zoology. The evaluation Synchonous criterion is the number of correct answers: 18 correct answers are enough to pass the test.
3- A final oral examination: Students should have passed the previous tests to be admitted to the final exam. During this examination the student must be able to describe an animal placing it in the context of the modern systematics. Moreover, the ability to appropriately expose the topics and to employ the correct terminology will be evaluated.
Oral examinations will be held on-line by employing the Microsoft Teams platform. Written test will be held using Moodle -SEB platform. In presence exams will be performed provided this is permitted by regulation.
Final evaluation is expressed on a scale of thirty and is calculated as the weighted mean between the different scores.
General Zoology
BIO/05 - ZOOLOGY - University credits: 4
Lessons: 32 hours
Systematic Zoology
BIO/05 - ZOOLOGY - University credits: 8
Practicals with elements of theory: 12 hours
Lessons: 56 hours

M - Z

Responsible
Lesson period
year
Teaching methods
Lectures of general zoology will be provided in synchronous mode on Microsoft Teams platform according to the first semester timetable. Lectures will be recorded and available for the students in asynchronous mode on the same platform. Power point presentations will be also available on the dedicated Ariel site.
Lessons of systematic zoology in asynchronous mode will be provided to the students in form of synthetic videos with audio comments uploaded on the Ariel site. Synchronous lectures will be dedicated to discussion of asynchronous contents: they will be provided according to the second semester timetable using Microsoft Teams platform and recorded to allow an asynchronous use.
Synchronous and asynchronous lectures will be provided by employing slides and/or videos. In addition, the students will attend 6 practical activities consisting of guided observations and descriptions of preserved animals.

Course syllabus and Teaching Resources
The contents and reference material will not change.

Assessment methods and Criteria
The exams will consist of:
1- An intermediate oral exam at the end of the course first part. The evaluation criteria include: the degree of acquired knowledge (the student should be able to describe the different animal structures and functions and the relationship with the environment), the ability to appropriately present the topics, the use of a correct terminology.
2- Terminal multiple choice test consisting in 30 questions regarding systematic zoology. The evaluation Synchronous criterion is the number of correct answers: 18 correct answers are enough to pass the test.
3- A final oral examination: Students should have passed the previous tests to be admitted to the final exam. During this examination the student must be able to describe an animal placing it in the context of the modern systematics. Moreover, the ability to appropriately expose the topics and to employ the correct terminology will be evaluated.
Oral examinations will be held on-line by employing the Microsoft Teams platform. Written test will be held using Moodle-SEB platform. Exams in presence will be held only when permitted by regulation.
Final evaluation is expressed on a scale of thirty and is calculated as the weighted mean between the different scores.
Course syllabus
Part one: general zoology
Fundamental principles of animal life. Body architecture, structures and main functions.
Nutrition; respiration; circulation; homeostasis (excretion, osmoregulation, thermoregulation); protection and support; movement and locomotion; nervous system and sensory receptors; endocrine system. Reproduction: modalities, significance and implications. Embryonic and post-embryonic development.
Animals and environment. Animal adaptations to different environments and life styles.
Inter-specific and intra-specific interactions: competition, predation, symbiosis, parasitism.
Principles of zoological nomenclature, criteria of classification and the identification of the organisms.

Part two: systematic zoology
Introduction to animal systematic.
Description of the principal morphological characters of the Classes, with attention to characters useful to formulate a classification at the level of subclasses and only for insect and vertebrates at level of Order.
Protozoa: origin, form and function, reproduction and life cycle.
Introduction to Metazoa: origin of complexity, body size, transport and metabolism. Systematic of Porifera, ground plan and water pumping system.
Intoduction to Protostomia.
Diploblastic animals: The Cnidarians, symmetry and systematic.
Introduction to triploblastic bilaterians origin, cephalisation, musculature, movement, targeting resources, physiological specialization.
Lophotrochozoa:
Systematic of Platyhelminthes: Turbellaria and Neodermata. Regeneration, life cycle and parasitism.
Systematic of Rotifera Acanthocephala and Nemertea,
Ground plan of Mollusca: mantel, shell, mantel cavity, foot and coelom.
Systematic of Gastropoda, Cephalopoda, Bivalvia, Scaphopoda.
Ground plan of Annelida: Segmentation, musculature and locomotion. Systematic of Polichaeta and Clitellata.
Ground plan of Lophophorata, Systematic of Bryozoa and Brachiopoda.
Ecdisozoa:
Ground plan and systematic of Nematoda and Nematomorpha.
Ground plan of Arthopoda: origin, exoskeleton, functional morphology, sense organs, excretion, gas exchanges.
Systematic of Chelicerata, Crustacea, Myriapoda, Hexapoda, principal Orders of Insects.
Introduction to Deuterostomia. Ground plan of Echinodermata: water-vascular system, symmetry. Systematic of Echinodermata and Hemichordata.
Ground plan of Chordata, notochord, skeleton, musculature, pharynx, sense organs.
Sistematic of Tunicata and Cephalochordata.
Ground plan and systematic of vertebrates.
Prerequisites for admission
No prerequisite is required.
Teaching methods
Teaching modalities are based on frontal lectures supported by Power Point presentations originally produced by the teacher. Students are invited to actively participate with informal questions and/or comments related to the treated topics in order to acquire critical capacities. The frontal lectures are complemented by a series of practical labs focused on the analysis of functional anatomy of some representative models of the main phyla. They consist of: microscopical observations of specimens, in vivo observations, dissections of model-animals. Course attendance is highly recommended.
Teaching Resources
Text books:
Zoologia (parte generale e sistematica), Autori vari, Idelson Gnocchi
Zoologia Hickman CP Jr., Roberts LS, Keen SL, Larson A, Eisenhour DJ, McGrawHill
Atlante di diversità e morfologia degli invertebrati, Sabelli, Piccin
Zoology, Miller S and Harley J, McGraw Hill.
Moreover, the students have access to both the digital form of the slides presented during the frontal lectures and the illustration of the practical activities on the website ARIEL.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The examination consists of three parts.
1- An intermediate oral exam at the end of the first part of the course. The evaluation criteria include: the degree of acquired knowledge (the student should be able to describe the different animal structures and functions as well as the relationships with the environment), the ability to appropriately present the topics, the use of a correct terminology.
2- A terminal multiple choice test consisting of 30 questions regarding systematic zoology. The evaluation criterion is the number of correct answers: 18 correct answers are requested to pass the test.
3- A final oral examination: Students should have passed the previous tests to be admitted to the final exam. During this examination the student must be able to describe an animal placing it in the context of the modern systematics. Moreover, the ability to appropriately expose the topics and to employ the correct terminology will be evaluated.
Final evaluation is expressed on a scale of thirty and is calculated as the weighted mean between the different scores.
General Zoology
BIO/05 - ZOOLOGY - University credits: 4
Lessons: 32 hours
Professor: Bonasoro Francesco
Systematic Zoology
BIO/05 - ZOOLOGY - University credits: 8
Practicals with elements of theory: 12 hours
Lessons: 56 hours
Professor(s)
Reception:
every day by appointment
floor 7B, Edifici Biologici, via Celoria 26