Economic and social history of the early modern age

A.Y. 2021/2022
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
SECS-P/12
Language
Italian
Learning objectives
The course aims to stimulate students' autonomous reflection on economic and social systems, through in-depth knowledge of the fundamental concepts and issues of European economic and social history, state policies and international economic relations, starting from the transformation that took place between the 17th century and the first English industrial revolution, up to the early 19th century. The course is aimed at students of the master degree course in Historical Sciences of the Faculty of Humanities and at those enrolled in master degrees who intend to acquire advanced knowledge and skills on the economic and social history of the modern age.
Expected learning outcomes
Knowledge: students should gain a better understanding of the main historical-economic concepts and fundamental topics of the economic and social history of the early modern age in the different space-time contexts and should be able to master the main historiographical issues.

Skills: be able to interpret data and information regarding the history of a given economy, linking facts and phenomena and understanding the interrelationships between the various historical aspects (institutional, economic, political and social); knowing how to communicate their knowledge coherently and organically, using the terminology and concepts of the discipline; being able to critically read primary sources and scientific texts relating to the historical period under examination.
Course syllabus and organization

Single session

Responsible
Lesson period
Second semester
More specific information on the delivery modes of training activities for academic year 2021/22 will be provided over the coming months, based on the evolution of the public health situation.
Course syllabus
The economics of the early modern age and the industrial revolution are fields of study that in recent decades have expanded with broader sources, tools, methodologies of research and explanatory models, placing European facts and phenomena in an increasingly global perspective. Several traditional interpretations of Europe's economic transformation have been reassessed and revised, thanks to numerous studies on various countries and regions of the continent, on different productive sectors, internal and international trade, and the interactions between economies, political institutions and systems. In particular, during the early modern era, new modes of growth and economic relations emerged and will last for a long time, conditioning subsequent international history. The interpretation of the English industrial revolution has been greatly enriched and has seen, for example, the re-evaluation of the gradualism of development, its rooting in the pre-industrial economy and European science and culture, the role of the English state, and of the 'merchant system '. At the same time, European growth is now placed within a global change that connects distant areas such as those of the Americas, Asia and Africa in a complex system of relationship.
The first part of the course will address, taking into account the different historiographical interpretations, some of the aspects of European economic and social history that today appear from a partially different perspective. Among these: the "great divergence" in the development path between Europe and the rest of the world (Asia and China in particular); the role of the state and economic policies in building the economic (and military) strength of the various state groups and in their competition; the social structure and consumption; agricultural production methods and systems, fences, the agro-food sector; demographic trends and urbanization; the problems of technological innovation and its transmission, together with the role of scientific culture, "industrial enlightenment", corporations and the state; the role of capital, credit and domestic and international trade; colonization; the long-term transformations of the organization of work and production up to the advent of the factory system which gives rise to the British industrial take-off and will contribute to deepening the gaps and differences in the levels of development between the various countries. In the second section of the course, the lessons will address the direct analysis of sources and archival documents from Europe's early modern age, and texts concerning issues learned during the first part.
Prerequisites for admission
A clear understanding of major themes of European early modern history is highly recommended.
Teaching methods
The course topics will be addressed through lectures, integrated with study materials (maps, tables, graphs, papers, websites, video). The second part of the course includes analysing archival documents from the early modern age and reading thematic articles. Learning materials will be made available from time to time by the teacher on the Ariel teaching website and will form part of the study programme for classroom students.
Teaching Resources
Attending students:
9 CFU:
- learning materials provided during the course together with:
- Silvia A. Conca Messina, Profitti del potere. Stato ed economia nell'Europa moderna, Roma-Bari, Latera 2016
and one text chosen from the following list:
- M. Fusaro, Reti commerciali e traffici globali in età moderna, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 2021 (or previous edition 2008)
- C.H. Parker, Relazioni globali nell'età moderna 1400-1800, Bologna, il Mulino, 2012
- Silvia A. Conca Messina, La trasformazione economica dell'Europa. Dal Seicento alla rivoluzione industriale, Milano (Cuem 2008 or Unicopli 2012)
- additional elective readings will be indicated on the Ariel site over the coming months

6 CFU
- learning materials provided during the course together with:
- Silvia A. Conca Messina, Profitti del potere. Stato ed economia nell'Europa moderna, Roma-Bari, Latera 2016

Non attending students:
6 CFU:
- Silvia A. Conca Messina, Profitti del potere. Stato ed economia nell'Europa moderna, Roma-Bari, Latera 2016
and one text chosen from the following list:
- M. Fusaro, Reti commerciali e traffici globali in età moderna, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 2021 (or previous edition 2008)
- C.H. Parker, Relazioni globali nell'età moderna 1400-1800, Bologna, il Mulino, 2012
- Silvia A. Conca Messina, La trasformazione economica dell'Europa. Dal Seicento alla rivoluzione industriale, Milano (Cuem 2008 or Unicopli 2012)
- additional elective readings will be indicated on the Ariel site over the coming months

9 CFU:
- Silvia A. Conca Messina, Profitti del potere. Stato ed economia nell'Europa moderna, Roma-Bari, Latera 2016
and two texts chosen from the following list:
- M. Fusaro, Reti commerciali e traffici globali in età moderna, Roma-Bari, Laterza, 2021 (or previous edition 2008)
- C.H. Parker, Relazioni globali nell'età moderna 1400-1800, Bologna, il Mulino, 2012
- Silvia A. Conca Messina, La trasformazione economica dell'Europa. Dal Seicento alla rivoluzione industriale, Milano (Cuem 2008 o Unicopli 2012)
- additional elective readings will be indicated on the Ariel site over the coming months

Erasmus students who wish to take the exam in English are invited to email the teacher well in advance before the scheduled exam session..
Assessment methods and Criteria
The final examination will be oral.
The teacher will evaluate: clarity of presentation; argumentative ability; properness of terminology; completeness; correct space-time orientation; ability to link facts and phenomena.
Unita' didattica A
SECS-P/12 - ECONOMIC HISTORY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica B
SECS-P/12 - ECONOMIC HISTORY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica C
SECS-P/12 - ECONOMIC HISTORY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor(s)
Reception:
This week: 18 January 16-19. Wednesday 16:00-19:00 via Microsoft Teams (please, contact via e-mail the teacher to schedule an appointment))