International Organisation

A.Y. 2021/2022
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
IUS/13
Language
Italian
Learning objectives
The course aims to provide the cognitive and analytical tools needed to understand the fundamental features of the international community and the institutional structure of the international legal order. The course will focus, firstly, on the essential elements of the international legal order in their historical, political, and social reality, as well as in the light of international practice (Units 1 and 2). Secondly, it will address the law of international organizations, i.e. entities set up by States by means of international agreements to create permanent structures of cooperation in the various fields of international relations. Particular attention will be paid to international cooperation in the fields of collective security, health, management of migration flows, and human rights. In this perspective, the institutional aspects and activities of selected international organizations that are particularly involved in the abovementioned fields will also be analyzed (namely, the United Nations, the World Health Organization, the European Union, and the Council of Europe) (Unit 3).
Expected learning outcomes
At the end of the course, students should be able to:
i. gain knowledge of the essential elements of international law and the law of international organizations;
ii. apply these legal concepts to understand and assess current events and emerging challenges in the international community, with particular regard to the areas of cooperation indicated in the programme;
iii. considering the professional outlets of the degree course, develop autonomy of judgement and learning skills in the subject matter of the course;
iv. master the correct terminology of international law.
Course syllabus and organization

A-K

Responsible
Lesson period
First semester
Should it become necessary to move to online teaching, the programme will be modified as follows:

Teaching methods:
As for the teaching modalities (distance, in-person or blended), depending on the health emergency-related circumstances ruling at the time, any instructions provided by the University will be duly followed.
Information on how to access the distance or in-person classes, as well as any other communication or information on the course, will be published on the course's ARIEL website in due course. For any information on access to classrooms, please refer to the University's website.

Reference materials:
The programme and reference materials will not be subject to any variation.

Methods of assessment and evaluation criteria:
Methods of assessment will remain unchanged. Written examinations may take place via the Moodle platform and/or the Proctorio system, while oral examinations may take place on Microsoft Teams. In any event, assessment criteria remain unchanged.
Up-to-date information will always be made available in due course on the Ariel page of the course, which students are invited to check periodically.
Course syllabus
ATTENDING STUDENTS

Unit 1:
The international legal community: Main features of the international legal order; Historical development of the international society.
The subjects of international law: States, the spatial scope of sovereignty and the classical limits to the exercise of territorial sovereignty; other subjects of the international legal system.
Sources of international law: International custom; "ius cogens"; treaties; other sources.

Unit 2:
International law and domestic legal systems.
The settlement of international disputes.
The law of international responsibility.

Unit 3 (International Organizations):
Principles of institutional law.
Cooperation in the field of international peace and security (including the United Nations).
Cooperation in health matters (including the World Health Organization).
Cooperation in the management of migration flows (including the European Union).
Cooperation in the field of human rights (including the Council of Europe).


NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS

Unit 1:
The international legal community: Main features of the international legal order; Historical development of the international society.
The subjects of international law: States, the spatial scope of sovereignty and the classical limits to the exercise of territorial sovereignty, including the immunities of States and their organs from the jurisdiction of foreign States; other subjects of the international legal system.
Sources of international law: International custom; "ius cogens"; treaties; other sources.

Unit 2:
International law and domestic legal systems.
The settlement of international disputes.
The law of international responsibility.

Unit 3:
Sanctions, use of force and collective security system.
Principles of institutional law: Membership; Structure and functioning; Legal personality and internal legal system.
Prerequisites for admission
No prior knowledge of the subject is required.
Teaching methods
Lectures (Power Point presentations will be published on the Ariel page of the course at the end of each lecture).
Presentation and analysis of case studies, judgments and pronouncements of international (judicial and non-judicial) organs, etc.
Teaching Resources
ATTENDING STUDENTS
· A. Cassese, Diritto internazionale, quarta edizione (a cura di Micaela Frulli), Il Mulino, Bologna, 2021 (except for Chapter V, paras 3 e 4).
· U. Draetta, Principi di diritto delle organizzazioni internazionali, Quarta edizione, Giuffrè Francis Lefèbvre, Milano, 2020.
· Lecture notes and any other teaching materials indicated on the Ariel page of the course before the end of the course.

NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS
· Cassese, Diritto internazionale, quarta edizione (a cura di Micaela Frulli), Il Mulino, Bologna, 2021.
· U. Draetta, Principi di diritto delle organizzazioni internazionali, Quarta edizione, Giuffrè Francis Lefèbvre, Milano, 2020.
· List of 10 sentences published on the course's Ariel website before the end of the course.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The exam aims to ascertain whether students have attained the expected learning outcomes (mentioned above).

ATTENDING STUDENTS have the possibility to take two intermediate exams instead of the final exam:
I. a first written intermediate exam (multiple choice questions) on Units 1 and 2 (weight 2/3 of the final grade);
II. a second written intermediate exam (one or more open-ended questions or, alternatively, a scenario to be analyzed by answering multiple choice questions) on Unit 3. N.B.: This is only for attending students who will have passed the first intermediate test with a sufficient or higher grade, i.e. equal to or higher than 18/30 (weighting 1/3 of the final grade).

- Students will only be allowed to decline to accept the final grade, i.e. the grade obtained from the weighted average of the grades obtained in the first and the second intermediate exam. Thus, it will not be possible to decline to accept a sufficient or higher grade obtained in one of the intermediate exams while accepting the one obtained in the other intermediate exam.
- Students who do not pass the first intermediate exam, as well as students declining to accept the final grade (i.e. the grade obtained from the weighted average of the grades obtained in the first and the second intermediate exam), will take the final exam on the entire programme in one of the ordinary sessions. The final exam may be written or oral depending on the number of students participating in each session. Updated information will be provided on the Ariel webpage of the course in due time. In the event of a written final exam, it will consist of two parts: a first part with multiple-choice questions on Units 1 and 2; a second part with one or more open-ended questions or, alternatively, a scenario to be analyzed by answering multiple choice questions on Unit 3.
- Attending students who obtain a sufficient or higher grade in the first intermediate exam, but do not pass the second intermediate exam, will take an oral exam only on Unit 2 in one of the ordinary sessions. In this case, please note that the grade obtained in the first intermediate exam will only be valid until the second ordinary session (February). After that date, students must take the final exam on the entire programme in one of the subsequent ordinary sessions. The final exam may be written or oral depending on the number of students participating in each session. Updated information will be provided on the Ariel webpage of the course in due time. In the event of a written final exam, it will consist of two parts: a first part with multiple-choice questions on Units 1 and 2; a second part with one or more open-ended questions or, alternatively, a scenario to be analyzed by answering multiple choice questions on Unit 3.

NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS may take the final exam on the entire programme in one of the ordinary sessions. The final exam may be written or oral depending on the number of students participating in each session. Updated information will be provided on the Ariel webpage of the course in due time. In the event of a written final exam, it will consist of two parts: a first part with multiple-choice questions on Units 1 and 2; a second part with one or more open-ended questions or, alternatively, a scenario to be analyzed by answering multiple choice questions on Unit 3.

N.B.: Students who declare themselves as attending students - irrespective of their actual presence in the classroom (or in synchronous mode on Microsoft Teams) - will be assessed on the basis of the syllabus indicated above for attending students (including the contents presented and discussed during the lectures). This also applies to the intermediate exams described above, which are reserved for attending students.
IUS/13 - INTERNATIONAL LAW - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Professor: Favuzza Federica

L-Z

Responsible
Lesson period
Second semester
Should it become necessary to move to online teaching, the programme will be modified as follows:

Teaching methods:
As for the teaching modalities (distance, in-person or blended), depending on the health emergency-related circumstances ruling at the time, any instructions provided by the University will be duly followed.
Information on how to access the distance or in-person classes, as well as any other communication or information on the course, will be published on the course's ARIEL website in due course. For any information on access to classrooms, please refer to the University's website.

Reference materials:
The programme and reference materials will not be subject to any variation.

Methods of assessment and evaluation criteria:
Methods of assessment will remain unchanged. Written examinations may take place via the Moodle platform and/or the Proctorio system, while oral examinations may take place on Microsoft Teams. In any event, assessment criteria remain unchanged.
Up-to-date information will always be made available in due course on the Ariel page of the course, which students are invited to check periodically.
Course syllabus
ATTENDING STUDENTS

Unit 1:
The international legal community: Main features of the international legal order; Historical development of the international society.
The subjects of international law: States, the spatial scope of sovereignty and the classical limits to the exercise of territorial sovereignty; other subjects of the international legal system.
Sources of international law: International custom; "ius cogens"; treaties; other sources.

Unit 2:
International law and domestic legal systems.
The settlement of international disputes.
The law of international responsibility.

Unit 3 (International Organizations):
Principles of institutional law.
Cooperation in the field of international peace and security (including the United Nations).
Cooperation in health matters (including the World Health Organization).
Cooperation in the management of migration flows (including the European Union).
Cooperation in the field of human rights (including the Council of Europe).


NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS

Unit 1:
The international legal community: Main features of the international legal order; Historical development of the international society.
The subjects of international law: States, the spatial scope of sovereignty and the classical limits to the exercise of territorial sovereignty, including the immunities of States and their organs from the jurisdiction of foreign States; other subjects of the international legal system.
Sources of international law: International custom; "ius cogens"; treaties; other sources.

Unit 2:
International law and domestic legal systems.
The settlement of international disputes.
The law of international responsibility.

Unit 3:
Sanctions, use of force and collective security system.
Principles of institutional law: Membership; Structure and functioning; Legal personality and internal legal system.
Prerequisites for admission
No prior knowledge of the subject is required.
Teaching methods
Lectures (Power Point presentations will be published on the Ariel page of the course at the end of each lecture).
Presentation and analysis of case studies, judgments and pronouncements of international (judicial and non-judicial) organs, etc.
Teaching Resources
ATTENDING STUDENTS
· A. Cassese, Diritto internazionale, quarta edizione (a cura di Micaela Frulli), Il Mulino, Bologna, 2021 (except for Chapter V, paras 3 e 4).
· U. Draetta, Principi di diritto delle organizzazioni internazionali, Quarta edizione, Giuffrè Francis Lefèbvre, Milano, 2020.
· Lecture notes and any other teaching materials indicated on the Ariel page of the course before the end of the course.

NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS
· Cassese, Diritto internazionale, quarta edizione (a cura di Micaela Frulli), Il Mulino, Bologna, 2021.
· U. Draetta, Principi di diritto delle organizzazioni internazionali, Quarta edizione, Giuffrè Francis Lefèbvre, Milano, 2020.
· List of 10 sentences published on the course's Ariel website before the end of the course.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The exam aims to ascertain whether students have attained the expected learning outcomes (mentioned above).

ATTENDING STUDENTS have the possibility to take two intermediate exams instead of the final exam:
I. a first written intermediate exam (multiple choice questions) on Units 1 and 2 (weight 2/3 of the final grade);
II. a second written intermediate exam (one or more open-ended questions or, alternatively, a scenario to be analyzed by answering multiple choice questions) on Unit 3. N.B.: This is only for attending students who will have passed the first intermediate test with a sufficient or higher grade, i.e. equal to or higher than 18/30 (weighting 1/3 of the final grade).

- Students will only be allowed to decline to accept the final grade, i.e. the grade obtained from the weighted average of the grades obtained in the first and the second intermediate exam. Thus, it will not be possible to decline to accept a sufficient or higher grade obtained in one of the intermediate exams while accepting the one obtained in the other intermediate exam.
- Students who do not pass the first intermediate exam, as well as students declining to accept the final grade (i.e. the grade obtained from the weighted average of the grades obtained in the first and the second intermediate exam), will take the final written exam on the entire programme in one of the ordinary sessions. This exam will consist of two parts: a first part with multiple-choice questions on Units 1 and 2; a second part with one or more open-ended questions on Unit 3.
- Attending students who obtain a sufficient or higher grade in the first intermediate exam, but do not pass the second intermediate exam, will take an oral exam only on Unit 2 in one of the ordinary sessions. In this case, please note that the grade obtained in the first intermediate exam will only be valid until the ordinary session of February. After that date, students must take the final written exam on the entire programme in one of the subsequent ordinary sessions. This exam will consist of two parts: a first part with multiple-choice questions on Units 1 and 2; a second part with one or more open-ended questions on Unit 3.

NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS may take the final exam in one of the ordinary sessions. The mode of the examination (written or oral) will depend on the number of students enrolled in each session and will be communicated in due time on the Ariel page of the course. In the case of a written exam, the exam will consist of two parts: a first part with multiple-choice questions on Units 1 and 2; a second part with one or more open-ended questions or, alternatively, a scenario to be analyzed by answering multiple choice questions on Unit 3.

N.B.: Students who declare themselves as attending students - irrespective of their actual presence in the classroom (or in synchronous mode on Microsoft Teams) - will be assessed on the basis of the syllabus indicated above for attending students (including the contents presented and discussed during the lectures). This also applies to the intermediate exams described above, which are reserved for attending students.
IUS/13 - INTERNATIONAL LAW - University credits: 9
Lessons: 60 hours
Educational website(s)
Professor(s)
Reception:
To set up an appointment, please write an e-mail to: martina.buscemi@unimi.it
Reception:
Tuesdays, 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. - Due to the coronavirus emergency situation, it is not possible to meet in person. If you wish to set a time for a video-call on Microsoft Teams, please send an email to: federica.favuzza@unimi.it.
Room 24 - 3rd floor - Department of International, Legal, Historical and Political Studies (via Conservatorio 7)