Moral philosophy

A.Y. 2020/2021
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
M-FIL/03
Language
Italian
Learning objectives
The course aims to provide students with some groundwork of moral philosophy, with special reference to foundational issues concerning the theory of value and applications in the areas of philosophy of history, bioethics and political philosophy.
Expected learning outcomes
Knowledge and understanding

At the end of the course the student is expected to:
- . knows the theoretical fundamentals of moral philosophy;
- knows the most significant ethical and value issues in their historical evolution
- know the core concepts, and the technical terms involved in the contemporary debate on the issues examined during the course;
- have a clear and critical understanding of the moral and axiological questions raised during the course, with special reference to the following theoretical oppositions: individualism and collectivism, freedom and justice, tradition and reason, deontology and utilitarianism, rights and duties.

Ability to apply knowledge and understanding

At the end of the course, the student is further expected to:
- be able to apply the knowledge and the conceptual tools in moral philosophy that have been provided to him/her.
- be able to provide a critical and informed approach to some of the main themes debated in moral philosophy.
- be able to read and to successfully interpret philosophical sources in the field of moral and political philosophy.
- can frame the key authors of ethical and value-related debates and related themes in a historical perspective
Course syllabus and organization

Single session

Responsible
Lesson period
Second semester
Teaching is going to be provided through the platform Microsoft Teams, both in sync according to the relevant timetable, and as record, available to the students on the same communication platform.
The course syllabus, readings and assignments will not be changed.
The following exams will take place in oral form through Microsoft Teams, or, if the normative situations will allow it, in university rooms to be designated.
Course syllabus
The course is aimed at tackling the problem of personal identity in an ontological and an ethical perspective, by starting from the representation of the Self in the pages of the early Sartre.
The problem of the identity of the acting and deciding subject is one of the cornerstones of the Sartrian analysis in Being and Nothingness (1943). This issue, which is rooted in the Husserlian concept of subjectivity, is at first critically revised by Sartre in his essay The transcendence of the Ego (1936). During the course we are going to examine first the notion of subjectivity in its general phenomenological framework, in order to follow Sartre's questioning with regard to the theme of freedom. Starting from the nest of problems that will have thus emerged, we are going to discuss personal identity in an autonomous form, in the light of recent studies in cognitive sciences and psychopathology.

The course is open to all students of the degree course in Philosophy, for the number of ECTS planned by the relevant curricula.
Prerequisites for admission
There is no specific requirement, except the ones that are general precondition for accessing our academic courses.
Teaching methods
Lectures
Debate and discussion
Teaching Resources
Readings and assignments for attending students
Assignments both for 6 and 9 ECTS exams:

· Sartre, J.-P., L'essere e il nulla, Milano, Saggiatore 2014 (selected pages).

· Zhok, A., Identità della persona e senso dell'esistenza, Milano, Meltemi, 2018.

Additional assignments for 9 ECTS exam:

· Sartre, J. P., La trascendenza dell'ego, Milano, Marinotti, 2011.

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Readings and assignments for non-attending students
Assignments both for 6 and 6 ECTS exams:

· Jean-Paul Sartre, L'essere e il nulla, Milano, Saggiatore 2014 (selected pages).

· Zhok, A., Identità della persona e senso dell'esistenza, Milano, Meltemi, 2018.


Parte aggiuntiva per 9 cfu

· Sartre, J. P., La trascendenza dell'ego, Milano, Marinotti, 2011.

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An introductory text on Sartre's thought, to be chosen among the follwing (in order of preference):

- Gardner S., Sartre's Being and Nothingness. A Reader's Guide, Continuum, London, 2009.
- Catalano, J., Reading Sartre, Cambridge University Press, 2010.
- Moravia, S., Introduzione a Sartre, Bari-Laterza 1983.
- Wormser, G., Sartre. Una sintesi, Marinotti, 2005.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The final evaluation consists of an oral exam on the matter treated during the course.
General criteria that contribute to the determination of the final marks are:
1) Accuracy of the answers (adequacy to the textual matter);
2) Ability to provide a synthesis of the main conceptual issues;
3) Comprehensiveness and richness of the answers;
4) Expressive quality (terminological property, fluency, accuracy)
5) A critical capacity of reading the texts.
Unita' didattica A
M-FIL/03 - MORAL PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica B
M-FIL/03 - MORAL PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica C
M-FIL/03 - MORAL PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor(s)