History of early modern philosophy

A.Y. 2020/2021
9
Max ECTS
60
Overall hours
SSD
M-FIL/06
Language
Italian
Learning objectives
The course aims to provide students with a solid basic knowledge of the history of early modern philosophical and scientific thought. The course will encourage the students' disposition to investigate new topics, thus increasing their knowledge and competence. Students will also develop a comprehension of the many interdisciplinary perspectives that characterise early modern thought.
Expected learning outcomes
By the end of the course, students will:
- know the fundamental aspects of the history of early modern Western philosophy, with special regard to the topics discussed in the course;
- understand the relationships connecting the history of philosophy to the history of science, politics, society, culture, theology, and religion;
- understand the concepts and lines of argument used by the authors analysed;
- know the basic methodological tools of the historical-philosophical investigation.
Moreover, students will be able to:
- apply the knowledge acquired in framing early modern authors and texts historically;
- apply the understanding of the historical relationships between philosophy and other doctrines to the analysis and discussion of texts and problems;
- apply the understanding of concepts and argumentative forms to the analysis of complex texts and problems.
Course syllabus and organization

(A)

Lesson period
Second semester
EMERGENCY REMOTE TEACHING
During the ongoing covid emergency, the course syllabus will be maintained with the following changes made to enhance the effectiveness of the online version of the course, which was originally designed for face-to-face teaching.
Online environments used:
Ariel: https://pgiordanettisfm.ariel.ctu.unimi.it/v5/home/Default.aspx
MSTeams: https://teams.microsoft.com/l/team/19%3a5cd3785d896e490c994074be6b7fe51…
Codice di accesso: 3bqwm2j
Teaching methods:
Classes will be held according to the following risk scenarios:
- maximum severity (red zone): classes will be held only remotely in synchronous mode (using MSTeams)
- high severity (orange zone): lessons will be held in mixed mode, partly in person and partly online. the face-to-face lessons will allow the participation of students connected with MSTeams as well as students in the classroom. Online lessons will be held synchronously (using MSTeams)
- severity (yellow zone): classes will be held according with the orange zone guidelines and, if conditions allow, the number of lessons on campus will be increased.
The calendar of in person lessons and updates will be published on the online course platform.

Learning assessment procedures and evaluation criteria:
The exam is [oral / written and is held on [MSTeams / Moodle SEB / proctoring system / etc] in any emergency situation, whether yellow, orange or red zone, in compliance with the guidelines provided by the University. The online course on [Ariel / Moodle / MSTeams ...] will make available constantly updated details about the oral examination sessions that will be held over several days.
Students wishing to participate in face-to-face lessons must refer to the following University provisions: https://www.unimi.it/it/studiare/frequentare-un-corso-di-laurea/seguire…
Students wishing to participate in MSTeams lessons must refer to the following technical guides: https://www.unimi.it/it/studiare/servizi-gli-studenti/servizi-tecnologi…
To participate in the exam sessions, students must refer to the following provisions: https://www.unimi.it/it/studiare/frequentare-un-corso-di-laurea/seguire…
Course syllabus
The course will address the third book of the World as will and representation by Schopenhauer. Didactic unity A will examine paragraphs 30-38, didactic unity B paragraphs 39-50 and didactic unity C paragraphs 51 and 52. Passages from Parerga and Paralipomena will be interpreted in relation to each unity.
L'unita didattica A esaminerà i par 30-38, l'unità didattica B i parr. 39-50, l'unità didattica C i parr. 51-52.
Prerequisites for admission
No specific requirements other than those required for access to the degree program
Teaching methods
Frontal Lessons
Teaching Resources
Attending students (6 e 9 cfu)
Giuseppe Cambiano, Luca Fonnesu, Massimo Mori (a cura di), La filosofia moderna. Il Seicento e il Settecento, Bologna, Il Mulino, 2018.
Ernst Cassirer, Storia della filosofia moderna. Il problema della conoscenza nella filosofia e nella scienza, volume terzo: I sistemi postkantiani. tomo II: Hegel, Herbart, Schopenhauer, Fries, Torino, Einaudi, 1978, pp. 514-557;
Franco Restaino, Schopenhauer: arte, genio, idee e volontà, in Franco Restaino, Storia dell'estetica moderna, Torino, UTET, 1991, pp. 155-170;

Non attending students (6 and 9 CFU) prepare also;
Giuseppe Invernizzi, Invito al pensiero di Schopenhauer, Milano, Mursia, 1995

Attending and non attending students (6 and 9 CFU)
Arthur Schopenhauer, Il mondo come volontà e rappresentazione, a cura di Giuseppe Riconda, Milano, Mursia, 1991, libro III, pp. 205-310: paragrafi 30-38; Arthur Schopenhauer, Supplementi a "Il mondo come volontà e rappresentazione", a cura di Giorgio Brianese, Torino, Einaudi, 2013: Supplementi al Libro III, pp. 469-523: paragrafi 29, 30, 31, 32, 33

Attending students (6 and 9 cfu)
Arthur Schopenhauer, Il mondo come volontà e rappresentazione, a cura di Giuseppe Riconda, Milano, Mursia, 1991, libro III, pp. 205-310: Paragrafi 39-50; Arthur Schopenhauer, Supplementi a "Il mondo come volontà e rappresentazione", a cura di Giorgio Brianese Torino, Einaudi, 2013: Supplementi al Libro III, pp. 524-546: Paragrafi 34, 35, 36

Non attending students (6 and 9 cfu) prepare also:
Giovanni Piana, Immagini per Schopenhauer (online)

Attending students (9 cfu)
Arthur Schopenhauer, Il mondo come volontà e rappresentazione, a cura di Giuseppe Riconda, Milano, Mursia, 1991, libro III, pp. 205-310: Paragrafi 51-52, 71; Arthur Schopenhauer, Supplementi a "Il mondo come volontà e rappresentazione", a cura di Giorgio Brianese Torino, Einaudi, 2013: Supplementi al Libro III, pp. 547-588: Paragrafi 37, 38, 39

Non attending students (9 cfu) prepare also:
Piero Giordanetti, Appendice. Schopenhauer e Kant, in Kant e la musica, Milano, Cuem, 2001.

Attending students (9 cfu)
Arthur Schopenhauer, Metafisica del bello e estetica, in Parerga e paralipomena, vol. 2, a cura di M. Carpitella, Milano, Adelphi, 1983, capitolo 19, pp. 548-598; Su giudizio, critica, applauso e gloria, Parerga e paralipomena, vol. 2, a cura di M. Carpitella, Milano, Adelphi, 1983, capitolo 20, pp. 599-632.
Assessment methods and Criteria
Oral: The exam, for both attending and non-attending students, consists of an oral test, an interview aimed at ascertaining the students' knowledge of the topics scheduled and provides for a question for each teaching unit.
Unita' didattica A
M-FIL/06 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica B
M-FIL/06 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica C
M-FIL/06 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours

(B)

Responsible
Lesson period
First semester
COURSE SYLLABUS:
The course syllabus will not be altered.

TEACHING RESOURCES:
Teaching resources will not be altered.

TEACHING METHODS:
The course will be taught online. Students will be able to follow the course:
- synchronously: on Microsoft Teams, according to the course schedule;
- asynchronously: on Ariel, where recorded lessons will be uploaded.
Students who will attend the course synchronously will be invited to actively participate to the discussion and exercise themselves in the interpretation of the primary sources analysed during the course.

ASSESSMENT METHODS AND CRITERIA:
Should it be impossible to take the final examination in person, student will take it online, on Microsoft Teams.
The structure and character of the final examination will not be altered.
Course syllabus
The course will explore the notions of fate, fortune, and free will in the philosophy and culture of Renaissance Europe.
To what extent is human action free? What is the influence of the stars upon human actions? How is one to shield themselves from ill fortune? How can men become the makers of their own fortune? How may divine omniscience allow for men's free will? — these are some of the questions posed by the authors that will be analysed during the course.
More precisely, the first part of the course (6 ECTS) will focus on the classical sources on the notions of fate, fortune, and free will. Hence, it will become possible to analyse the character and purpose of different adaptations of these sources in the debate belonging to fifteenth- and sixteenth-century moral philosophy, philosophy of history, and natural research.
Throughout the last 10 lessons of the course (additional 3 ECTS), the main topic of inquiry will be the concept of free will in relation to the dogma concerning God's omniscience and omnipotence. Aim of this section of the course will be to analyse the theological debate that, emerging in the early Renaissance, eventually led to the Protestant Reformation.
Throughout the course, students will be offered an analysis of the fundamental aspects of the history of early modern Western philosophy, with special regard to the historical, political, and scientific contexts in which early modern authors developed their philosophical stances.
Prerequisites for admission
No prior knowledge is needed.
Teaching methods
Lectures
Debate and discussion
Text interpretation practice
Teaching Resources
ASSIGNED READINGS FOR ATTENDING STUDENTS, 6 ECTU:
The readings preceded by ** will be made available online.

Primary sources:
- ** L.B. Alberti, "Il fato e la fortuna" and "La virtù," in Intercenales, ed. by F. Bacchelli and L. D'Ascia, Bologna: 2003. [12 pp.]
- ** L.B. Alberti, "Prologo," in I libri della famiglia, ed. by R. Romano and A. Tenenti, Torino: 1969. [14 pp.]
- ** P. Bracciolini, "La varietà della fortuna," lib. 1, in Visitiamo Roma nel Quattrocento, ed. by C. D'Onofrio, Roma: 1989. [11 pp.]
- ** N. Machiavelli, selected passages from Tutte le opere, ed. by M. Martelli, Firenze: 1971. [30 pp.]
- ** G. Pico della Mirandola, "Orazione sulla dignità dell'uomo," in De hominis dignitate, Heptaplus, De ente et uno e scritti vari, ed. by E. Garin, Firenze: 1942. [31 pp.]
- ** P. Pomponazzi, selected passages from Il fato, il libero arbitrio e la predestinazione, ed. by V. Perrone Compagni, Torino: 2004. [166 pp.]
- ** G. Pontano, "La fortuna," in I dialoghi, La fortuna, La conversazione, ed. by F. Tateo, Firenze and Milano: 2019. [110 pp.]
- G. Savonarola, Contro gli astrologi, ed. by C. Gigante, Roma: 2000, pp. 33-124. (ISBN: 8884023203).

Secondary sources:
- G. Cappelli, L'umanesimo italiano da Petrarca a Valla, Roma: 2018, pp. 55-106, 204-215, 305-336. (ISBN: 9788843091348).
- ** C. Vasoli, Le filosofie del Rinascimento, ed. by P.C. Pissavino, Milano: 2002, pp. 148-152, 172-174, 229-243, 326-343, 350-357, 374-380.


ADDITIONAL READINGS FOR ATTENDING STUDENTS SITTING THE EXAM FOR 9 ECTS:

Primary sources:
- ** L. Valla, "Dialogo intorno al libero arbitrio," in Scritti filosofici e religiosi, ed. by G. Radetti, Firenze: 1953. [29 pp.]
- D. Erasmo and M. Lutero, Libero arbitrio / Servo arbitrio, ed. by F. De Michelis Pintacuda, Torino: 2018, pp. 45-185. (ISBN: 9788870167696).

Secondary sources:
- G. Cappelli, L'umanesimo italiano da Petrarca a Valla, Roma: 2018, pp. 337-380. (ISBN: 9788843091348).
- ** C. Vasoli, Le filosofie del Rinascimento, ed. by P.C. Pissavino, Milano: 2002, pp. 269-288, 293-304.

--------------------

ASSIGNED READINGS FOR NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS, 6 ECTS:
The readings preceded by ** will be made available online.

Primary sources:
- ** L.B. Alberti, "Il fato e la fortuna" and "La virtù," in Intercenales, ed. by F. Bacchelli and L. D'Ascia, Bologna: 2003. [12 pp.]
- ** L.B. Alberti, "Prologo," in I libri della famiglia, ed. by R. Romano and A. Tenenti, Torino: 1969. [14 pp.]
- ** P. Bracciolini, "La varietà della fortuna," lib. 1, in Visitiamo Roma nel Quattrocento, ed. by C. D'Onofrio, Roma: 1989. [11 pp.]
- ** N. Machiavelli, selected passages from Tutte le opere, ed. by M. Martelli, Firenze: 1971. [30 pp.]
- ** G. Pico della Mirandola, "Orazione sulla dignità dell'uomo," in De hominis dignitate, Heptaplus, De ente et uno e scritti vari, ed. by E. Garin, Firenze: 1942. [31 pp.]
- ** P. Pomponazzi, selected passages from Il fato, il libero arbitrio e la predestinazione, ed. by V. Perrone Compagni, Torino: 2004. [166 pp.]
- ** G. Pontano, "La fortuna," in I dialoghi, La fortuna, La conversazione, ed. by F. Tateo, Firenze and Milano: 2019. [110 pp.]
- G. Savonarola, Contro gli astrologi, ed. by C. Gigante, Roma: 2000, [including the introduction]. (ISBN: 8884023203).

Secondary sources:
- A. Brown, Machiavelli e Lucrezio: Fortuna e libertà nella Firenze del Rinascimento, Roma: 2013. (ISBN: 9788843068951).
- G. Cappelli, L'umanesimo italiano da Petrarca a Valla, Roma: 2018, pp. 55-106, 204-215, 305-336. (ISBN: 9788843091348).
- R. Ramberti, Il problema del libero arbitrio nel pensiero di Pietro Pomponazzi, Firenze: 2007. (ISBN:9788822256782).
- A. Suggi, Sotto il cielo della Luna: Fato e fortuna in Pietro Pomponazzi e Niccolò Machiavelli, Pisa: 2019. (ISBN: 9788846756374).
- ** C. Vasoli, Le filosofie del Rinascimento, ed. by P.C. Pissavino, Milano: 2002, pp. 148-152, 172-174, 229-243, 326-343, 350-357, 374-380.

ADDITIONAL READINGS FOR NON-ATTENDING STUDENTS SITTING THE EXAM FOR 9 ECTS:

Primary sources:
- ** L. Valla, "Dialogo intorno al libero arbitrio," in Scritti filosofici e religiosi, a cura di G. Radetti, Firenze: 1953. [29 pp.]
- D. Erasmo e M. Lutero, Libero arbitrio / Servo arbitrio, a cura di F. De Michelis Pintacuda, Torino: 2018, [including the introduction]. (ISBN: 9788870167696).

Secondary sources:
- G. Cappelli, L'umanesimo italiano da Petrarca a Valla, Roma: 2018, pp. 337-380. (ISBN: 9788843091348).
- R. Torzini, I labirinti del libero arbitrio: La discussione tra Erasmo e Lutero, Firenze: 2000. (ISBN: 8822249054).
- F. De Michelis Pintacuda, Tra Erasmo e Lutero, Roma: 2001, parts 1-3. (ISBN: 9788884980021).
- ** C. Vasoli, Le filosofie del Rinascimento, ed. by P.C. Pissavino, Milano: 2002, pp. 269-288, 293-304.
Assessment methods and Criteria
The final examination will consist of an oral exam covering the assigned readings and the general theme of the course. During the exam, students will also be asked to read, interpret, and comment on passages taken from the primary sources assigned as readings.

Attending students will be asked questions concerning both the assigned readings and the topics expounded during the lessons.

Non-attending students will not be examined on topics discussed exclusively during the lessons.
Unita' didattica A
M-FIL/06 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor: Mori Giuliano
Unita' didattica B
M-FIL/06 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Unita' didattica C
M-FIL/06 - HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY - University credits: 3
Lessons: 20 hours
Professor: Mori Giuliano
Professor(s)
Reception:
Friday, 12-15. Suspended until 10.9.21
Microsoft Teams
Reception:
Thursdays, h. 13,30-16,30 (on skype/teams). Students can schedule an online meeting by email
Skype / Teams